Health system not doing enough to protect patients, experts

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Physician and Nurse Pushing Gurneyby Marshall Allen
ProPublica

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The health care community is not doing enough to track and prevent widespread harm to patients, and preventable deaths and injuries in hospitals and other settings will continue unless Congress takes action, medical experts said today on Capitol Hill.

“Our collective action in patient safety pales in comparison to the magnitude of the problem,” said Dr. Peter Pronovost, senior vice president for patient safety and quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “We need to say that harm is preventable and not tolerable.” Continue reading

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Nurses delaying retirement – study

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Woman_doctor_surgeonBy Shefali Luthra
KHN / JULY 16TH, 2014

Despite predictions of an impending nurse shortage, the current number of working registered nurses has surpassed expectations in part due to the number of baby-boomer RNs delaying retirement, a study by the RAND Corp. found.

The study, published online Wednesday by Health Affairs, notes that the RN workforce, rather than peaking in 2012 at 2.2 million – as the researchers predicted a decade ago – reached 2.7 million that year and has continued growing.

The trend of nurses delaying retirement accounted for an extra 136,000 RNs in 2012, the study suggests. Continue reading

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If I have a job-based plan, can I still buy on an exchange?

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 Q. It is my understanding that people who are employed and have insurance through their jobs that offer individual coverage for less than 9.5 percent of their income are not eligible to enroll through the state exchange. Am I confused?

A. Yes, you are, but yours is a common misperception. Almost anyone can buy a health plan on the health insurance marketplaces. As long as you live in the United States, you’re a U.S. citizen or someone who’s lawfully present here, and you’re not in jail, you can probably buy a marketplace plan. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – July 18th

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Mosquito

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Getting specialty care a challenge with some ACA plans

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“Narrow networks” keep the price of some Obamacare insurance plans low, but they also keep certain hospitals and physicians out of reach for sick patients

Sawhney 300

Dr. Charu Sawhney of Hope Clinic in southwest Houston listens to the lungs of Mang Caan, a refugee from Burma. (Photo by Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media)

Primary care doctors have reported problems making referrals for patients who have purchased some of the cheaper plans from the federal insurance marketplace.

Complaints about narrow networks with too few doctors have attracted the attention of federal regulators and have even prompted lawsuits.

 ‘Oh by the way, when you sign up, make sure you sign up for the right plan.’

But they’re also causing headaches in the day-to-day work of doctors and clinics. “The biggest problem we’ve run into is figuring out what specialists take a lot of these plans,” said Dr. Charu Sawhney of Houston. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – July 17th

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Biohazard

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State disciplines health care providers – July 15 update

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Seal_of_WashingtonPeriodically Washington State Department of Health issues an update on disciplinary actions taken against health care providers, including suspensions and revocations of licenses, certifications, or registrations of providers in the state.

The department also suspends the credentials of people who have been prohibited from practicing in other states.

Information about health care providers is also on the agency’s website.

To find this information click on “Provider Credential Search” on the left hand side of the Department of Health home page (www.doh.wa.gov).

The site includes information about a health care provider’s license status, the expiration and renewal date of their credential, disciplinary actions and copies of legal documents issued after July 1998.

This information is also available by calling 360-236-4700.

Consumers who think a health care provider acted unprofessionally are also encouraged to call and report their complaint.

Here is the July 16th update issued by the Washington State Department of Health: Continue reading

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A small business owner shops for health insurance

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By Heidi de Marco
KHN Staff Writer

This KHN story was produced in collaboration with .

Sandra Lopez 2 300

Sandra Lopez  (Photo by Heidi de Marco/KHN).

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. — Alongside one of this city’s canals, blocks from the beach, Sandra Lopez is finally living her idea of the American dream.

In 1996, six years after crossing the border from Mexico without papers, she began working at Las Fajitas, a popular Mexican restaurant as a cashier and cook. With the help of her boss, she received a work visa in 2001.

Eleven years after that, she bought the business – a bustling establishment where Lopez knows most customers by name. Mexican lanterns hang from the ceiling, and cheers from a soccer match on TV fill the room.

Lopez said the income from her small business fluctuates monthly. “People think that because you own a business, you have lots of money…that life is easy,” she said. “But it’s hard work and I have so many bills to pay.”

Lopez, her husband, and an adult child in the household live on about $46,000 a year.

For years, she felt she couldn’t afford health insurance for herself, let alone her half dozen employees: “How can I offer them something I don’t even have?” Continue reading

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Senate Democrats fight to reverse Supreme Court, state abortion restrictions

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Most of the momentum in fights over birth control and abortion has been in the direction of opponents of late. But you wouldn’t know that by watching the U.S. Senate.

Democrats who control the chamber have scheduled a vote for Wednesday on a bill that would effectively reverse the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby ruling regarding contraceptive requirements in the Affordable Care Act.

And on Tuesday the Judiciary Committee heard testimony on a separate, sweeping measure that would invalidate many state abortion restrictions. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – July 16th

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playing cards

Photo courtesy of Steve “Woodsy” Wood

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Readers’ questions about contraceptive coverage and Medicare enrollment

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Q. How will my health insurance change now that the Supreme Court has ruled that some employers that have religious objections to contraceptives don’t have to provide birth control coverage?

A. Although the recent decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores allows a “closely held” company to decline to cover contraception, the health law requirement that most plans provide such coverage without cost to consumers remains in effect and will continue to apply to women in most plans, say experts. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – July 15th

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Eye

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How to protect your children from cancer – CDC

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Cancer Prevention Starts in Childhood

Tips from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Photo of two parents and three children sitting outside

You can reduce your children’s risk of getting cancer later in life.

Start by helping them adopt a healthy lifestyle with good eating habits and plenty of exercise to keep a healthy weight.

Then follow the tips below to help prevent specific kinds of cancer. Continue reading

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Helping the mentally ill join the workforce

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Photo courtesy of Sanja Gjenero

Photo courtesy of Sanja Gjenero

By Michael Ollove
Stateline

By his own admission, for many years Cyrus Napolitano’s mental illness—bipolar disorder—did not make him an ideal employee.

Perhaps the worst moment came when he walked into the Brooklyn McDonald’s he was managing to discover some now-forgotten worker infractions.

“Whatever it was,” he said last week, “it triggered an explosion where I was screaming at the top of my lungs and beating a path of destruction all the way to the back, knocking everything off shelves and kicking the back door with my boot.”

He left the job at McDonald’s, as he did various other jobs over the decades—as a waiter, a bartender, a concierge at a luxury condo building. During one eight-year period in the 2000s, after his third suicide attempt, he could barely work at all.

But that was some time ago. Thanks to his eventual involvement with Fountain House, a community mental health center in Manhattan, Napolitano, now 53, is in his fourth year of steady, part-time employment as the “scanning clerk” at an international law firm, a stress-free job he credits with helping him manage his illness. Continue reading

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