Washington state to offer breast cancer license plates

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BC-MountainRibbonOLYMPIA – There’s a new way to donate and show your support for breast cancer screening and testing. Starting Oct. 16, you have a chance to bid on the first batch of breast cancer license plates before they go on sale to everyone, starting in January.

Money raised from the sale of the plates will pay for breast cancer screenings and follow up tests for women with limited or no insurance through the state Department of Health’s Breast, Cervical, and Colon Health Program.

Money raised from the sale of the plates will pay for breast cancer screenings and follow up tests for women with limited or no insurance.

The auction runs through the end of the month. More information about the auction and how to bid can be found online. After this month’s auction, breast cancer license plates will be available for purchase in January 2015 for $60 through the state Department of Licensing. Continue reading

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Q&A: What are states doing to prepare for an Ebola outbreak?

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ebolaBy Christine Vestal
Stateline

As fears of an Ebola outbreak rise, federal agencies are taking steps to protect and inform the public.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta is taking the lead on most aspects of the effort – issuing containment guidelines to hospitals and other health workers, training airport personnel on screening methods, and creating uniform lab tests to diagnose the deadly disease

. But as in all public health emergencies, state and local public health departments are the nation’s first line of defense.

What role do state and local health agencies play in protecting the public?

State and local health department workers are often first responders, communicating directly with residents and health care workers, as well as coordinating with related agencies and hospitals through established communication networks. They also manage public health laboratories that test for the virus.

For example, when the Liberian national, Thomas Eric Duncan, tested positive for Ebola in September, the Texas Department of State Health Services reported the laboratory results to the hospital that was treating him and the Dallas County health agency began tracking down people who had direct contact with him.

Later, the state agency issued quarantine orders for those who had come in contact with Duncan, the Dallas County Sheriff’s Department delivered the orders and county health officials checked the temperatures of those who were quarantined. Continue reading

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Second nurse with Ebola had recently traveled by air

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From the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Frontier Airlines logoOn the morning of Oct. 14, the second healthcare worker reported to the hospital with a low-grade fever and was isolated.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms that the second healthcare worker who tested positive last night for Ebola traveled by air Oct. 13, the day before she reported symptoms.

Here’s the full statement from the CDC:

CDC and Frontier Airlines Announce Passenger Notification Underway

On the morning of Oct. 14, the second healthcare worker reported to the hospital with a low-grade fever and was isolated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms that the second healthcare worker who tested positive last night for Ebola traveled by air Oct. 13, the day before she reported symptoms.

Because of the proximity in time between the evening flight and first report of illness the following morning, CDC is reaching out to passengers who flew on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth Oct. 13.

CDC is asking all 132 passengers on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth on October 13 (the flight route was Cleveland to Dallas Fort Worth and landed at 8:16 p.m. CT) to call 1 800-CDC INFO (1 800 232-4636).

After 1 p.m. ET, public health professionals will begin interviewing passengers about the flight, answering their questions, and arranging follow up. Individuals who are determined to be at any potential risk will be actively monitored.

The healthcare worker exhibited no signs or symptoms of illness while on flight 1143, according to the crew. Frontier is working closely with CDC to identify and notify passengers who may have traveled on flight 1143 on Oct. 13.  Passengers who may have traveled on flight 1143 should contact CDC at 1 800-CDC INFO (1 800 232-4636).

Frontier Airlines Statement

“At approximately 1:00 a.m. MT on October 15, Frontier was notified by the CDC that a customer traveling on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth on Oct. 13 has since tested positive for the Ebola virus. The flight landed in Dallas/Fort Worth at 8:16 p.m. local and remained overnight at the airport having completed its flying for the day at which point the aircraft received a thorough cleaning per our normal procedures which is consistent with CDC guidelines prior to returning to service the next day. It was also cleaned again in Cleveland last night. Previously the customer had traveled from Dallas Fort Worth to Cleveland on Frontier flight 1142 on October 10.

Customer exhibited no symptoms or sign of illness while on flight 1143, according to the crew. Frontier responded immediately upon notification from the CDC by removing the aircraft from service and is working closely with CDC to identify and contact customers who may traveled on flight 1143.

Customers who may have traveled on either flight should contact CDC at 1 800 CDC-INFO.

The safety and security of our customers and employees is our primary concern. Frontier will continue to work closely with CDC and other governmental agencies to ensure proper protocols and procedures are being followed.”

For more information on ebola, visit http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola.

 

 

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California Prop. 46, inspired by tragedy, pits doctors against lawyers

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Bob and Carmen Pack with their children Troy and Alana, who were killed by an impaired driver.

Bob and Carmen Pack with their children Troy and Alana, who were killed by an impaired driver.

This story is part of a partnership that includes KQEDNPR and Kaiser Health News.

Troy and Alana Pack had spent the day at their neighborhood Halloween party in Danville.

Ten-year-old Troy went as a baseball player, and 7-year-old Alana was a good witch.

In the afternoon, they changed out of their costumes and set out for a walk with their mother. Destination: Baskin Robbins 31 Flavors.

“Alana, she liked anything with chocolate,” says their father, Bob Pack. “Troy, for sure, bubble gum ice cream, ’cause he liked counting the bubble gums that he would get.”

Bob Pack stayed home. His family made it only half a mile down the road before his phone rang: “I received a call from a neighbor screaming there’d been an accident. And I raced down there.”

An impaired driver had veered off the road and hit Troy and Alana head-on. Pack was doing CPR on Troy when the paramedics arrived.

“I remember telling them I love them, and hang on. Just praying that they could hang on,” he says

I needed to take action for justice.

Troy and Alana were pronounced dead at the hospital. In the months after their death, Pack’s wife, Carmen, retreated into her Catholic faith. Bob Pack was angry.

“I think, for me to get through, I needed action,” he says, “and I needed to take action for justice for Troy and Alana, and also for doing something that I thought maybe I could change to benefit others in the future.” Continue reading

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Health news headlines – October 15th

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Croissant

Photo by Sanja Gjenero

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Global health news – October 15th

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Globe floating in air

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Good enough to pass: Washington gets a C+ Women’s Health Report Card – Puget Sound Business Journal

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C plus gradeThe state gets a C+ and comes in at No. 22 on the 2014 Women’s Health Report Card, a list from the Alliance for a Just Society, a Seattle-based national network of economic justice organizations including the Washington Community Action Network.

via Good enough to pass: Washington gets a C+ Women’s Health Report Card – Puget Sound Business Journal.

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Vaccination rates lower among US adults born abroad

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Vaccine SquareBy Milly Dawson
Health Behavior News Service

Nationality at birth appears to play a significant role in whether or not adults in the United States are routinely vaccinated for preventable diseases, a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds, reflecting a risky medical lapse for more than one in ten people nationwide.

Foreign-born adult U.S. residents, who make up about 13 percent of the population, receive vaccinations at significantly lower rates than U.S.-born adults.

Foreign-born adult U.S. residents make up about 13 percent of the population.

This gap poses special risks for certain groups of people who are vulnerable to many serious and sometimes deadly diseases that vaccines can prevent.

The study’s lead author, Peng-Jun Lu, MD, PhD, a researcher at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, noted the rise in the foreign-born population in the United States, which stood at only five percent in 1970.

“As their numbers continue to rise, it will become increasingly important to consider this group in our efforts to increase vaccination and eliminate coverage disparities,” he said. Continue reading

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Modest premium hikes, higher consumer costs likely for job-based plans

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Fall is enrollment season for many people who get insurance through their workplace. Premium increases for 2015 plans are expected to be modest on average, but the shift toward higher out-of-pocket costs overall for consumers will continue as employers try to keep a lid on their costs and incorporate health law changes.

Experts anticipate that premiums will rise a modest 4 percent in 2015, on average, slightly higher than last year but lower than typical recent Increases.

Experts anticipate that premiums will rise a modest 4 percent in 2015.

“That’s really low,” says Tracy Watts, a senior partner at benefits consultant Mercer.

Even so, more employers say they’re making changes to their health plans in 2015 to rein in cost growth; 68 percent said they plan to do so in 2015, compared with 55 percent just two years earlier, according to preliminary data from Mercer’s annual employer benefits survey.

They are motivated in part by upcoming changes mandated by the health law. Starting in January, companies that employ 100 workers or more generally have to offer those who work at least 30 hours a week health insurance or face penalties.

“The more people you cover, the more it’s going to cost,” says Watts.

In addition, experts say, employers are ramping up efforts to avoid a 40 percent excise tax on expensive health plans—those with premiums that exceed $10,200 for individuals or $27,500 for families–that will take effect in 2018. Continue reading

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Global health news – October 14th

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Globe floating in air

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Even if you think you know what your policy covers, read it again

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MKreidlerPhotoBy Mike Kreidler, Washington State Insurance Commissioner 

We’ve said this before and we will keep saying this … you must read your policies, the sooner after you purchase them the better.

We receive calls daily from frustrated and often distraught consumers because they are having a problem with their coverage, premiums or outcomes of their claims because they thought they had a certain type of coverage that they did not actually have.

We can’t overemphasize the importance of this sentence: When you sign up for coverage of any kind, be sure to check the policy when you receive it!

This is your responsibility as a policyholder. Read it, look at the coverage and prices, and ask your agent or insurance company any questions immediately before you have a claim or policy payment issue.

It’s much easier to make a correction early in the process rather than after you have a claim and things aren’t correct.

Read more about your insurance on our website.

Questions? You can contact our consumer advocates online or at 1-800-562-6900.

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Washington Healthplanfinder promises streamlined health plan renewal process

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From Washington Healthplanfinder

Washington MapOLYMPIA, Wash. –  Starting Nov. 15, Washington Healthplanfinder customers who signed up for a Qualified Health Plan last year will be eligible to renew their health coverage for 2015 plans.

Most customers may be eligible to automatically renew their current health plan, but customers also have the option to update their application and shop for new plan options.

Approximately 80 percent of Qualified Health Plans offered in 2014 will be offered again during the next open enrollment period.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Before you auto-renew be sure to check whether there are better plans available. For more read Michael Ollove’s article: Automatically renewing your Obamacare policy could cost you thousands

Current customers should be on the look-out for “Open Enrollment Renewal” notices from Washington Healthplanfinder as early as this week. Continue reading

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Got insurance? You still may pay a steep price for prescriptions

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This KHN story also ran in .

Sandra Grooms recently got a call from her oncologist’s office. The chemotherapy drugs he wanted to use on her metastatic breast cancer were covered by her health plan, with one catch: Her share of the cost would be $976 for each 14-day supply of the two pills.

“I said, ‘I can’t afford it,’ ” said Grooms, 52, who is insured through her job as a general manager at a janitorial supply company in Augusta, Ga. “I was very upset.”

Insurers and employers shifting more of the cost of high-priced pharmaceuticals to the patients who take them.

.Even with insurance, some patients are struggling to pay for prescription drugs for conditions such as cancer, arthritis, multiple sclerosis or HIV/AIDS, as insurers and employers shift more of the cost of high-priced pharmaceuticals to the patients who take them.

Increasingly, health plans – even those offered to people with job-based coverage–require hefty payments by patients like Grooms.

In some plans, patients must pay 20 to 40 percent or more of the total cost of medications that insurers deem to be specialty drugs and place in the highest tiers of patient cost sharing. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – October 13th

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vegetables

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