Price tags on health care? Now in Massachusetts

Share

Twenty-dollar bill in a pill bottleBy Martha Bebinger, WBUR
KHN / OCT 09, 2014

This story is part of a reporting partnership that includes WBUR, NPR and Kaiser Health News.

Without much fanfare, Massachusetts launched a new era of health care shopping last week.

Anyone with private health insurance in the state can now go to his or her health insurer’s website and find the price of everything from an office visit to an MRI to a Cesarean section. For the first time, health care prices are public.

“Let the light shine in on health care prices.”

It’s a seismic event. Ten years ago, I filed Freedom of Information Act requests to get cost information in Massachusetts—nothing.

Occasionally over the years, I’d receive manila envelopes with no return address, or secure .zip files with pricing spreadsheets from one hospital or another.

Then two years ago, Massachusetts passed a law that pushed health insurers and hospitals to start making this once-vigorously guarded information more public.

Now as of Oct. 1, Massachusetts is the first state to require that insurers offer real-time prices by provider in consumer-friendly formats.

“This is a very big deal,” said Undersecretary for Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation Barbara Anthony. “Let the light shine in on health care prices.”

There are caveats. Continue reading

Share

Health news headlines – October 11th

Share

$100-dollar bill inside a capsule

Share

Global health news – October 11th

Share

Globe floating in air

Share

Ebola Doesn’t Abide by Borders – US News

Share

airplane thumb Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, says travel bans not the way to go:

Preventing travel from affected countries is an inadequate measure.

Not only do we need to ensure rapid passage of people in and out of the area for response purposes, but we also need to ensure the continued flow of supplies desperately needed to address the outbreak at its source, which is the best way to break the chain of infection.

With the number of people passing through airports all over the world, identifying those who could have come into contact with people from affected countries is an impossible task. Multiply this by the number of connecting flights through European or other international hubs and it becomes even harder.

via Ebola Doesn’t Abide by Borders – US News.

Share

One in four Latinos remain uninsured

Share

By Teresa Wiltz
Stateline

In the “sala de espera,” or waiting room, at La Clinica del Pueblo, a community health center in Washington, D.C., signs in Spanish encourage patients to “Empower yourself!” and sign up for insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act.

Adults slump in chairs, scribbling on application forms, texting friends, waiting. In a tiny office a few feet away, William Joachin, the center’s patient access manager, faces down the frustrations of trying to navigate the federal health care program for the thousands of mostly Central American immigrants who flood the clinic each year. He’s not alone.

A year after open enrollment for the ACA began, one in four Latinos living in the U.S. does not have health insurance, according to new census data, more than any other ethnic population in the country—and most states have few backups in place to help those in the coverage gap.

Latino health insurance graphic

 

Latino immigrants are the hardest hit: Foreign-born Hispanics are more than twice as likely to be uninsured than are U.S.-born Hispanics, according to census data compiled by the Pew Research Center. (Pew also funds Stateline.) Continue reading

Share

Despite health law, long-acting contraceptives still often not free for women

Share

New research suggests that teenagers are more likely to choose long-acting contraceptives when cost is removed from the equation. And free coverage of such methods is required by the health law.

But now, a study has found that free coverage of such methods too often still falls short.

Why is free coverage of long-acting contraceptives—which can prevent pregnancy from three months up to 10 years—still lacking for roughly 40 percent of women?

The study, published in the journal Contraception by the Guttmacher Institute, found that insurance coverage of contraceptives without cost sharing has improved markedly since the health law’s requirement became effective for most women in 2013.

But gaps in coverage remain. The Guttmacher researchers analyzed the experiences of 892 privately insured women who used prescription contraceptives between the fall of 2012, before the law’s provisions took effect for most women, and the spring of 2014.

It found that the proportion of women who paid nothing for their intrauterine devices increased from 45 percent to 62 percent during that time.

The proportion of women who had no cost sharing for injectable contraceptives grew from 27 percent to 59 percent. (There weren’t enough women using hormonal implants to include in the study.)

Some long-acting contraceptives such as IUDS can cost hundreds of dollars up front, putting them out of reach financially for some women unless insurance covers the cost. Continue reading

Share

Health news headlines – October 10th

Share

Photo courtesy of Michal Zacharzewski

Share

Global health news – October 10th

Share

Globe floating in air

Share

The ominous math of the Ebola epidemic – The Washington Post

Share

Global health officials are looking closely at the “reproduction number,” which estimates how many people, on average, will catch the virus from each person stricken with Ebola. The epidemic will begin to decline when that number falls below one. A recent analysis estimated the number at 1.5 to 2.

via The ominous math of the Ebola epidemic – The Washington Post.

Share

2015 Medicare Part B premiums and deductibles to remain the same as last two years

Share

Center for Medicare & Medicaid ServicesNext year’s standard Medicare Part B monthly premium and deductible will remain the same as the last two years. Medicare Part B covers physicians’ services, outpatient hospital services, certain home health services, durable medical equipment, and other items.  For the approximately 49 million Americans enrolled in Medicare Part B, premiums and deductibles will remain unchanged in 2015 at $104.90 and $147, respectively.

via 2015 Medicare Part B premiums and deductibles to remain the same as last two years.

Share

For those who were once obese, stigma often remains

Share
Carlos Romero and girlfriend Kate Rowe sit down for a meal that they cooked together at Romero's apartment in Seattle (Photo by Mike Kane/NPR).

Carlos Romero and girlfriend Kate Rowe sit down for a meal that they cooked together at Romero’s apartment in Seattle (Photo by Mike Kane/NPR).

This KHN story also ran on NPR

SEATTLE — Carlos Romero’s apartment is marked with remnants from his former life: a giant television from his days playing World of Warcraft and a pair of jeans the width of an easy chair. The remnants of that time—when he weighed 437 pounds—mark his body too: loose, hanging skin and stretch marks.

“I lift weights and work out and work hard, but there’s lasting damage,” said Romero.

Yet for all the troubles he had dating when he was obese—all those unanswered requests on dating web sites—shedding weight left him uneasy about how much to reveal.

Carlos Romero 1 176

Romero once weighed 437 pounds. (Photo by Sarah Varney/KHN).

“If you were to say to someone on the first date, ‘I lost 220 pounds,’ you’re indicating that you had a very serious issue at one point and that you may still have that issue,” he said. “So it’s not something I put on a dating profile because I don’t want people to judge me for it.”

Indeed, the stigma of obesity is so strong that it can remain even after the weight is lost. Holly Fee, a sociologist at Bowling Green State University, has conducted some of the only research on dating attitudes toward the formerly obese. In 2012, Fee published her findings in the journal Sociological Inquiry.

She found that potential suitors said they would hesitate to form a romantic relationship with someone who used to be heavy. “The big dragging factor in why they had this hesitation in forming this romantic relationship was that they believed these formerly obese individuals would regain their weight,” Fee said. Continue reading

Share

Mercer Island boil-water advisory lifted

Share
Photo: shrff14 on Flickr

Photo: shrff14 on Flickr

The City of Mercer Island announced Wednesday it has lifted the current Boil-Water Advisory in consultation with the state Department of Health. Restaurants may reopen after speaking directly with a Health Inspector from Public Health – Seattle & King County and following completion of step-by-step procedures.

For the sixth day in a row, water-sample test results are clear: all 18 of the latest samples revealed no presence of E. Coli or Total Coliform, and chlorine levels were adequate.  This brings the total number of samples collected to more than 100 over 6 days.

Mayor Bruce Bassett said: “I know I can speak for the whole community when I say that this day has been a long time coming. I’d like to thank staff and partner agencies for their extensive commitment to not only resolving this incident and implementing corrective measures, but also ensuring the safety of the community. We all look forward to life returning back to normal.” Continue reading

Share

Health news headlines – October 9th

Share

Running shoes full shot

Share

Global health news – October 9th

Share

Globe floating in air

Share