Health news headlines – July 10

Share

ACA health reform logo

Share

Choosing Wisely – An Evidence-based Music Video

Share

Choosing Wisely – a parody of the infectious Pharrell Williams song “Happy”  produced by James McCormack — makes the case for choosing wisely when it comes to making health care decisions and if you choose wisely it will make you happy.

An initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation, Choosing Wisely is working to spark conversations between providers and patients to ensure the right care is delivered at the right time.

Participating organizations have created lists of “Things Providers and Patients Should Question” which include evidence-based recommendations that should be discussed to help make wise decisions about the most appropriate care based on a patients’ individual situation.

To learn more about the Choosing Wisely campaign go www.choosingwisely.org.

Continue reading

Share

Extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years

Share

ScaleFrom the National Cancer Institute

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a younger age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to a new study.

The study, led by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, found that people with class III (or extreme) obesity had a dramatic reduction in life expectancy compared with people of normal weight. The findings appeared July 8, 2014, in PLOS Medicine.

 Six percent of US adults are now classified as extremely obese

“While once a relatively uncommon condition, the prevalence of class III, or extreme, obesity is on the rise. In the United States, for example, six percent of adults are now classified as extremely obese, which, for a person of average height, is more than 100 pounds over the recommended range for normal weight,” said Cari Kitahara, Ph.D., Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, NCI, and lead author of the study.  Continue reading

Share

Health news headlines – July 9th

Share
Photo by Brainloc

Photo by Brainloc

Share

Narrow networks bring down premiums in Chattanooga

Share
Chattanooga,_Tennessee_Skyline

Photo by Emilio Craddock – Creative Commons license

This KHN story also ran in .

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — Angela Allen’s struggle to ease her neck pain has been a huge pain in the neck.

Her regular spine doctor does not accept the new insurance she bought through the federal health marketplace.

Allen, who has two slipped disks in her neck vertebrae, said the closest specialist she found who would see her and take her insurance works 34 miles away in another county.

She belatedly learned that her physical therapist also is out of network and she owes $900. “It’s been a nightmare,” said Allen, a 42-year-old office manager.

Yet these restrictions carry an enviable price tag. At $187 a month, Allen’s policy is cheaper than almost any other midlevel, or silver, plan in the nation. Continue reading

Share

Some plans skew drug benefits to drive away patients, advocates warn

Share

The insurers say they’re in compliance with the law.

Four Florida insurers allegedly discriminate against people with HIV/AIDS by structuring their prescription drug benefits so that patients are discouraged from enrolling, according to a recent complaint filed with federal officials. Continue reading

Share

Health headlines in the news – July 8th

Share

Running shoes full shot

Share

How Americans can get a better return on their health care investments – CDC series

Share

USA America buttonFrom the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Each year, the U.S. spends nearly $9,000 for the health of every American — far more than what the governments of other countries spend on the health of their citizens – yet life expectancy and health outcomes are generally worse for Americans than for citizens of other developed nations in North America and Europe. Continue reading

Share

Medicaid tailored to those with mental health problems

Share

Jigsaw puzzle with one piece to add

This KHN story also ran in .

Studies show that enrollees with mental illness, who also have chronic physical conditions, account for a large share of Medicaid spending.

Seeking to improve care and lower costs, Florida this month became the first state to offer a Medicaid health plan designed exclusively for people with serious mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, major depression or bipolar conditions. Continue reading

Share

Health news headlines – July 7th

Share

Flag_of_Colorado

Share

Women’s Health – Week 44: Puberty

Share

tacuin womenFrom the Office of Research on Women’s Health

Puberty is the set of physical changes that occur when a person becomes sexually mature. Puberty usually occurs between ages 10 and 14 for girls and ages 12 and 16 for boys.

In girls, the first sign of puberty is often breast development. Other signs are the growth of hair in the pubic area and in the armpits. Sometimes acne appears and, eventually, menstruation begins. Continue reading

Share

Top 5 stories of the week

Share
Credit: Dan Shirly

Credit: Dan Shirly

Share

Little progress made in reducing health disparities for people with disabilities

Share

WheelchairBy Katherine Kahn
Health Behavior News Service

Psychological distress in people with disabilities is associated with increased prevalence of other chronic conditions and reduced access to health care and preventive care services, finds a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

KEY POINTS

  • Almost one in three adults with a disability report experiencing moderate to serious psychological distress.
  • Chronic illness is more common in adults with both disabilities and serious psychological distress.
  • Adults with disabilities and psychological distress report reduced access to health care and preventive services.

Approximately 30 percent of adults with disabilities reported having moderate to serious psychological distress, with over 12 percent reporting serious psychological distress.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Healthy People series established goals to reduce disparities among people with disabilities, but there has been very little progress toward reaching these goals, says lead author Catherine Okoro, Ph.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia. Continue reading

Share

After court’s home health aide ruling, fewer state workers to organize

Share

U.S. Supreme CourtBy Jake Grovum
Stateline

The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in a case brought by home health care aides in Illinois casts doubt on labor agreements between such workers and state governments in nine other states.

It also closes off—or at least complicates—one of labor’s clearest paths to reversing a decades-long trend of declining ranks and shrinking clout.

The petitioners in Harris v. Quinn were home health care aides who did not want to join a union, though a majority of their co-workers had voted to join. Continue reading

Share

Health news Headlines – July 5

Share

The_Sun_by_the_Atmospheric_Imaging_Assembly_of_NASA's_Solar_Dynamics_Observatory_-_20100819

Share