Global health news – October 13th

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How to stop the Ebola epidemic – Paul Farmer

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From People Power Television

As the death toll from the West African Ebola outbreak nears 1,400, two American missionaries who received experimental drugs and top-notch healthcare have been released from the hospital.

We spend the hour with Partners in Health co-founder Dr. Paul Farmer discussing what can be done to stop the epidemic and the need to build local healthcare capacity, not just an emergency response.

“The Ebola outbreak, which is the largest in history that we know about, is merely a reflection of the public health crisis in Africa, and it’s about the lack of staff, stuff and systems that could protect populations, particularly those living in poverty, from outbreaks like this or other public health threats,” says Farmer, who has devoted his life to improving the health of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people.

He is a professor at Harvard Medical School and currently serves as the special adviser to the United Nations on community-based medicine. He has written several books including, “Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plagues.”

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Texas health worker tests positive for Ebola

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The number of cases with Ebola, shown here, could double by the end of the month. There is a one-in-five chance it will reach the U.S. in that same time, researchers predict. Photo by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A Dallas health worker who had helped care for the Ebola patient from Liberia who later died from the disease has tested positive for the virus, officials at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas announced Sunday.

Here is the statement from the hospital:

Late Saturday evening, a preliminary blood test on a care-giver at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas showed positive for Ebola.  The healthcare worker had been under the self-monitoring regimen prescribed by the CDC, based on involvement in caring for patient Thomas Eric Duncan during his inpatient care that started on September 28.  Continue reading

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Living Longer in British Columbia | Sightline Daily

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BC-vs-WA-life-expectancy-275x271As of 1980, for example, lifespans in Washington and British Columbia were nearly in a dead heat: 75.1 years for Washington, 75.8 for BC.  Yet since then, BC has pulled ahead. By 2013, lifespans in BC had reached 82.7 years, compared with just 80.4 years in Washington—a gap of 2.3 years, which is wider than at any point since Washington began annual reporting of life expectancy statistics.

via Living Longer in British Columbia | Sightline Daily.

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Price tags on health care? Now in Massachusetts

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Twenty-dollar bill in a pill bottleBy Martha Bebinger, WBUR
KHN / OCT 09, 2014

This story is part of a reporting partnership that includes WBUR, NPR and Kaiser Health News.

Without much fanfare, Massachusetts launched a new era of health care shopping last week.

Anyone with private health insurance in the state can now go to his or her health insurer’s website and find the price of everything from an office visit to an MRI to a Cesarean section. For the first time, health care prices are public.

“Let the light shine in on health care prices.”

It’s a seismic event. Ten years ago, I filed Freedom of Information Act requests to get cost information in Massachusetts—nothing.

Occasionally over the years, I’d receive manila envelopes with no return address, or secure .zip files with pricing spreadsheets from one hospital or another.

Then two years ago, Massachusetts passed a law that pushed health insurers and hospitals to start making this once-vigorously guarded information more public.

Now as of Oct. 1, Massachusetts is the first state to require that insurers offer real-time prices by provider in consumer-friendly formats.

“This is a very big deal,” said Undersecretary for Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation Barbara Anthony. “Let the light shine in on health care prices.”

There are caveats. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – October 11th

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$100-dollar bill inside a capsule

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Global health news – October 11th

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Globe floating in air

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Ebola Doesn’t Abide by Borders – US News

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airplane thumb Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, says travel bans not the way to go:

Preventing travel from affected countries is an inadequate measure.

Not only do we need to ensure rapid passage of people in and out of the area for response purposes, but we also need to ensure the continued flow of supplies desperately needed to address the outbreak at its source, which is the best way to break the chain of infection.

With the number of people passing through airports all over the world, identifying those who could have come into contact with people from affected countries is an impossible task. Multiply this by the number of connecting flights through European or other international hubs and it becomes even harder.

via Ebola Doesn’t Abide by Borders – US News.

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One in four Latinos remain uninsured

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By Teresa Wiltz
Stateline

In the “sala de espera,” or waiting room, at La Clinica del Pueblo, a community health center in Washington, D.C., signs in Spanish encourage patients to “Empower yourself!” and sign up for insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act.

Adults slump in chairs, scribbling on application forms, texting friends, waiting. In a tiny office a few feet away, William Joachin, the center’s patient access manager, faces down the frustrations of trying to navigate the federal health care program for the thousands of mostly Central American immigrants who flood the clinic each year. He’s not alone.

A year after open enrollment for the ACA began, one in four Latinos living in the U.S. does not have health insurance, according to new census data, more than any other ethnic population in the country—and most states have few backups in place to help those in the coverage gap.

Latino health insurance graphic

 

Latino immigrants are the hardest hit: Foreign-born Hispanics are more than twice as likely to be uninsured than are U.S.-born Hispanics, according to census data compiled by the Pew Research Center. (Pew also funds Stateline.) Continue reading

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Despite health law, long-acting contraceptives still often not free for women

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New research suggests that teenagers are more likely to choose long-acting contraceptives when cost is removed from the equation. And free coverage of such methods is required by the health law.

But now, a study has found that free coverage of such methods too often still falls short.

Why is free coverage of long-acting contraceptives—which can prevent pregnancy from three months up to 10 years—still lacking for roughly 40 percent of women?

The study, published in the journal Contraception by the Guttmacher Institute, found that insurance coverage of contraceptives without cost sharing has improved markedly since the health law’s requirement became effective for most women in 2013.

But gaps in coverage remain. The Guttmacher researchers analyzed the experiences of 892 privately insured women who used prescription contraceptives between the fall of 2012, before the law’s provisions took effect for most women, and the spring of 2014.

It found that the proportion of women who paid nothing for their intrauterine devices increased from 45 percent to 62 percent during that time.

The proportion of women who had no cost sharing for injectable contraceptives grew from 27 percent to 59 percent. (There weren’t enough women using hormonal implants to include in the study.)

Some long-acting contraceptives such as IUDS can cost hundreds of dollars up front, putting them out of reach financially for some women unless insurance covers the cost. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – October 10th

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Photo courtesy of Michal Zacharzewski

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Global health news – October 10th

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Globe floating in air

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The ominous math of the Ebola epidemic – The Washington Post

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Global health officials are looking closely at the “reproduction number,” which estimates how many people, on average, will catch the virus from each person stricken with Ebola. The epidemic will begin to decline when that number falls below one. A recent analysis estimated the number at 1.5 to 2.

via The ominous math of the Ebola epidemic – The Washington Post.

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2015 Medicare Part B premiums and deductibles to remain the same as last two years

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Center for Medicare & Medicaid ServicesNext year’s standard Medicare Part B monthly premium and deductible will remain the same as the last two years. Medicare Part B covers physicians’ services, outpatient hospital services, certain home health services, durable medical equipment, and other items.  For the approximately 49 million Americans enrolled in Medicare Part B, premiums and deductibles will remain unchanged in 2015 at $104.90 and $147, respectively.

via 2015 Medicare Part B premiums and deductibles to remain the same as last two years.

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