How safe are outpatient surgery centers?

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Popularity Of Outpatient Surgery Centers Leads To Questions About Safety

Woman_doctor_surgeonBy By Sandra G. Boodman
KHN and Washington Post

Wendy Salo was alarmed when she learned where her doctor had scheduled her gynecologic operation: at an outpatient surgery center.

“My first thought was ‘Am I not important enough to go to a real hospital?’ ” recalled Salo, 48, a supermarket department manager who said she felt “very trepidatious” about having her ovaries removed outside a hospital.

Before the Sept. 30 procedure, Salo drove 20 miles from her home in Germantown, Md., to the Massachusetts Avenue Surgery Center in Bethesda for a tour. Her fears were allayed, she said, by the facility’s cleanliness and its empathic staff.

Salo later joked that the main difference between the multi-specialty center and Shady Grove Adventist Hospital — where she underwent breast cancer surgery last year — was that the former had “better parking.”

Salo’s initial concerns mirror questions about the safety of outpatient surgery centers that have mushroomed since the highly publicized death of Joan Rivers.

The 81-year-old comedian died Sept. 4 after suffering brain damage while undergoing routine throat procedures at Yorkville Endoscopy, a year-old free-standing center located in Manhattan.

Federal officials who investigated Rivers’ death, which has been classified by the medical examiner as a “therapeutic complication,” found numerous violations at the accredited clinic, including:

  • a failure to notice or take action to correct Rivers’ deteriorating vital signs for 15 minutes;
  • a discrepancy in the medical record about the amount of anesthesia she received;
  • an apparent failure to weigh Rivers, a critical factor in calculating an anesthesia dose;
  • and the performance of a procedure to which Rivers had not given written consent.

In addition, one of the procedures was performed by a doctor who was not credentialed by the center.

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International Community Health Service recognized as ‘National Quality Leader’

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International Community Health ServicesInternational Community Health Services (ICHS)  been cited by the federal government as a “National Quality Leader” for exceeding national clinical benchmarks for chronic disease management, preventive care, and perinatal/prenatal services.

The Seattle-based health center also was recognized for achieving some of the best overall clinical outcomes nationally for health centers and for showing significant improvement in clinical quality measures between 2012 and 2013.

ICHS is a non-profit community health center that specializes in providing affordable health care services to Seattle and King County’s Asian, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and other underserved communities.

It operates medical and dental centers in Seattle’s International District and Holly Park neighborhoods, as well as in the cities of Bellevue and Shoreline; a school-based health center at the Seattle World School, and a primary care clinic at ACRS, a social and mental health services agency in Seattle.

In recognition of its accomplishment and to fund further quality improvement, ICHS will receive $84,169 in Affordable Care Act funding by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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Boeing, Starbucks demand and get better healthcare for their workers – LA Times

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starbucks-logoSeattle’s big companies have pushed local hospitals and doctors to meet the kinds of rigorous standards they use to build airplanes or brew coffee, reports The Los Angeles Times. Also in the news are a look at the SHOP exchanges for small businesses and the rate increases some of those employers are facing.

Where employers use quality control to shape healthcare – LA Times.

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Health news headlines – December 16th

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Sun Tanning

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Global health news – December 16th

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Globe floating in air

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Obamacare signup deadline collection . . .

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Four helpful articles on the ins and outs of signing up for health insurance for 2015
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Some states retreat on mental health spending

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By Michael Ollove
Stateline

Fewer states increased their spending on mental health programs this year compared to last year, when a spate of horrific shootings by assailants with histories of mental illness prompted a greater focus on the shortcomings of the country’s mental health system.

Screen Shot 2014-12-15 at 9.49.48 AM

From State Mental Health Legislation 2014 Trends, Themes & Effective Practices – NAMI

Some states slashed their mental health budgets significantly this year. At the same time, however, a number of states adopted mental health measures in 2014 that won plaudits from behavioral health advocates.

survey of state spending published last week by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) found that 29 states plus the District of Columbia increased their spending on mental health in fiscal year 2015. A year earlier, 37 states plus D.C. increased their mental health budgets.

NAMI warned that the momentum to improve state mental health services, which was especially powerful after the December 2012 Sandy Hook massacre in Connecticut, has slowed.

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Flu on the rise in King County

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Flu virusesFlu is here—and it’s a nasty one!

By Meredith Li-Vollmer
Public Health – Seattle & King County

Influenza is noticeably on the rise in King County, according the Public Health – Seattle & King County” sCommunicable Disease and Epidemiology unit.

Last week, the number of laboratory tests for flu rose sharply and a handful of schools, daycare programs, and long-term care facilities reported flu outbreaks.

A severe flu forecast

The flu season has only just begun, but the CDC is finding that so far, seasonal influenza A H3N2 viruses have been the most common flu viruses circulating. What’s the significance? In flu seasons in which H3N2 viruses predominate, there often are more severe flu illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths.

On top of that, roughly half of the H3N2 viruses that the CDC analyzed to date are drift variants: viruses with genetic changes that make them different from this season’s vaccine virus. This means the vaccine’s ability to protect against those viruses may be reduced.

So should you still get this year’s flu vaccine? Continue reading

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Seasonal alert – Watch out for carbon monoxide poisoning

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Dangerous source of carbon monoxide

From the Washington Poison Center

The Washington Poison Center (WAPC) received 308 calls in 2013 on carbon monoxide poisonings; 121 of those cases were managed in a healthcare facility. With winter right around the corner and people starting to crank up their heaters, the WAPC has some information to share.

What is carbon monoxide?

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless gas produced by incomplete combustion of different fuel sources (oil, gas, charcoal, or wood). It is a leading cause of poisoning injury and death in the United States.

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Top five health stories of the week

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Credit: Dan Shirly

Credit: Dan Shirly

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Health news headlines – December 13th

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MRI of the knee

Credit: Wikipedia – Creative Commons License

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Global health news – December 13th

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Globe floating in air

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Illnesses due to raw milk on the rise

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From the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Photo by Maciej Lewandowski

Photo by Maciej Lewandowski

The average annual number of outbreaks due to drinking raw (unpasteurized) milk have more than quadrupled – from an average of three outbreaks per year during 1993-2006 to 13 per year during 2007-2012. Overall, there were 81 outbreaks in 26 states from 2007 to 2012.

As more states have allowed the legal sale of raw milk, there has been a rapid increase in the number of raw milk-associated outbreaks.The outbreaks, which accounted for about 5 percent of all food-borne outbreaks with a known food source, sickened nearly 1,000 people and sent 73 to the hospital. More than 80 percent of the outbreaks occurred in states where selling raw milk was legal.

As more states have allowed the legal sale of raw milk, there has been a rapid increase in the number of raw milk-associated outbreaks.

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