State disciplines health-care providers

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Seal_of_WashingtonPeriodically Washington State Department of Health issues an update on disciplinary actions taken against health care providers, including suspensions and revocations of licenses, certifications, or registrations of providers in the state.

The department also suspends the credentials of people who have been prohibited from practicing in other states.

Information about health care providers is also on the agency’s website.

To find this information click on “Provider Credential Search” on the left hand side of the Department of Health home page (www.doh.wa.gov).

The site includes information about a health care provider’s license status, the expiration and renewal date of their credential, disciplinary actions and copies of legal documents issued after July 1998.

This information is also available by calling 360-236-4700.

Consumers who think a health care provider acted unprofessionally are also encouraged to call and report their complaint.

Here is the September 25th update issued by the Washington State Department of Health: Continue reading

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Top five stories of the week

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Credit: Dan Shirly

Credit: Dan Shirly

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Got Drugs? – National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day is Today

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Got Drugs

Got Drugs? – National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

September 27, 2014
10AM to 2PM

The National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day aims to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse of medications.

Locate a Collection Site Near You

 

 

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Pressure from providers leads some women to have C-sections, inductions

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Blue Pregnant BellyBy Christen Brownlee
Health Behavior News Service

Pregnant women who felt pressured to have a labor induction or cesarean section by their obstetrical care providers were significantly more likely to have these procedures, even if there was no medical need for them, suggests a new study in the journal Health Services Research.

Both cesarean deliveries and labor inductions continue to rise, accounting for about a third of births in the U.S.

While both procedures can be life saving for mothers and babies, previous studies have found that they can also increase the risk of poor health outcomes, such as respiratory problems for newborns and infections and death for mothers, as well as significantly increasing health care costs. Continue reading

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Global health news – September 27th

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Training young men to change their lives by saving others

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In Oakland, California, a program called EMS Corps trains young men to become certified emergency medical technicians. Students with disadvantaged backgrounds get an intensive five-month course, as well as a powerful, new outlook on what they can do in life and for their neighborhoods. Sarah Varney of Kaiser Health News reports in collaboration with the NewsHour.

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Harborview as busy as ever, even with more people insured | Local News | The Seattle Times

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HarborviewWith more people obtaining health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, places like Harborview Medical Center are providing much less “charity” (uncompensated) care. The Emergency Department there is as busy as ever, though.

via Harborview as busy as ever, even with more people insured | Local News | The Seattle Times.

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Gay, bisexual men complacent about HIV testing, study finds – SFGate

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aids-ribbonFewer than 20 percent of gay and bisexual men have been tested for HIV in the previous six months — as recommended by national public health agencies — and almost a third have never been tested at all, according to a survey conducted in the summer by the Kaiser Family Foundation. The same survey found that gay and bisexual men were largely uninformed about drug therapies to prevent HIV and that most of them rarely, if ever, talk to their doctors about the virus.

via Gay, bisexual men complacent about HIV testing, study finds – SFGate.

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Vicodin, some other pain meds will be harder to get – DEA

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Patients who use drugs containing hydrocodone as a pain reliever or cough suppressant are going to have to jump through more hoops to get them starting next month.

The Drug Enforcement Administration is reclassifying so-called “hydrocodone combination products” (HCP) from Schedule III to Schedule II under the Controlled Substances Act, which will more tightly restrict access. Vicodin, for example, is an HCP because it has hydrocodone and acetaminophen.

The final regulation, which takes effect Oct. 6, will mean that patients generally must present a written prescription to receive the drug, and doctors will no longer be able to call in a prescription to the pharmacy in most instances.

Many patients with painful chronic diseases, including cancer, take hydrocodone combination products

.The regulation is a response to the widespread misuse of prescription pain killers.

In an emergency, doctors will still be able to call in a prescription, according to the new rule. And although prescription refills are prohibited, a doctor can, at his discretion, issue multiple prescriptions that would provide up to a 90-day supply.

These measures don’t satisfy consumer advocates or pharmacists who are opposed to the new rule. Continue reading

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Only half of US adults being screened for diabetes

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GlucometerBy Sharyn Alden
Health Behavior News Service

A study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that only half of adults in the U.S. were screened for diabetes within the last three years, less than what is recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

As the rates of obesity have increased, so does the incidence of type 2 diabetes, which also increases the risk for cardiovascular disease.

Up to one-third of people with diabetes are undiagnosed, note the researchers. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – September 26th

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Global health news – September 26th

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FIXED: A film about bionic solutions for the disabled – Seattle Premier, Octoboer 9th

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FIXED: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement to premiere in Seattle October 9

What:

FIXED, an award-winning documentary that explores the social impact of human augmentation (things like bionic limbs and neural implants), will appear on the big screen in Seattle for the first time.

The screening is being held in conjunction with Disability Awareness Month. A brief panel discussion will follow the 60-minute film.

Tickets are $5 for students with ID; $10 for all others. FIXED will be shown with subtitles.

To learn more about the film go here

When:

Thursday, October 9, 7 p.m.; door open 6:45 p.m.

Where:

Varsity Theatre, 4329 University Way, NE, Seattle, WA 98105

Who:

  • The panel discussion will include:
    UW Professor Sara Goering, who conducts research in neuroethics and disability;
  • Dr. Eran Klein, UW/OHSU researcher and neurologist;
  • Joanne Woiak, historian at the UW in disability studies and
  • Kayla Brown, DO-IT (disabilities, opportunities, internetworking and technology) program at the UW.
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