Category Archives: Smoking

10 percent of US adults have drug use disorder at some point in their lives


75 percent report not receiving any form of treatment.

From the National Institutes of Health

Three red and white capsulesA survey of American adults revealed that drug use disorder is common, co-occurs with a range of mental health disorders and often goes untreated.

The study, funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health, found that about 4 percent of Americans met the criteria for drug use disorder in the past year and about 10 percent have had drug use disorder at some time in their lives.

“Based on these findings, more than 23 million adults in the United States have struggled with problematic drug use,” said George F. Koob, Ph.D., NIAAA director. “Given these numbers, and other recent findings about the prevalence and under-treatment of alcohol use disorder in the U.S., it is vitally important that we continue our efforts to understand the underlying causes of drug and alcohol addiction, their relationship to other psychiatric conditions and the most effective forms of treatment.”

“Based on these findings, more than 23 million adults in the United States have struggled with problematic drug use.” —George F. Koob, Ph.D.

NIAAA directorA diagnosis of drug use disorder is based on a list of symptoms including craving, withdrawal, lack of control, and negative effects on personal and professional responsibilities. Continue reading


HUD Proposes Nationwide Smoking Ban In Public Housing


Cigarette thumbPublic housing residents would be banned from smoking, not just in public spaces on the premises, but in their own apartments under a proposal Thursday by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The public will have 60 days to comment on the proposal, which is drawing criticism from many residents and being praised by others concerned about second-hand smoke.


Should the smoking age be 21? Some legislators say yes


Cigarette thumbBy Jenni Bergal

Nearly a dozen states have considered bills this year to boost the legal age for buying tobacco products.

While a growing number of states have turned their attention to marijuana legalization, another proposal has been quietly catching fire among some legislators—raising the legal age to buy cigarettes.

Measures to raise the smoking age to 21 were introduced this year in Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, the District of Columbia and here in Washington state.

This summer, Hawaii became the first state to approve increasing the smoking age from 18 to 21 starting Jan 1. A similar measure passed the California Senate, but stalled in the Assembly. And nearly a dozen other states have considered bills this year to boost the legal age for buying tobacco products.

“It really is about good public health,” said Democratic Hawaii state Sen. Rosalyn Baker, who sponsored the legislation. “If you can keep individuals from beginning to smoke until they’re at least 21, then you have a much greater chance of them never becoming lifelong smokers.”

Supporters say hiking the legal age to 21 not only will save lives but will cut medical costs for states. But opponents say it would hurt small businesses, reduce tax revenue and violate the personal freedom of young adults who are legally able to vote and join the military. Continue reading


Pesticides and Pot: What marijuana users should know


Cannabis_leaf_marijuana_potBy Jeff Duchin, MD
Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County

The passage of I-502 in 2012 means that marijuana is now a legal crop in Washington State. Growers of most of the fruit and vegetables we eat routinely use pesticides and other chemicals to reduce or eliminate crop destruction.

Because marijuana is considered illegal by the federal government, the crop stands outside the federal pesticide evaluation and oversight system.

In Colorado and elsewhere, pesticides that were not approved for use on marijuana have been reported in product from recreational stores.

Could this happen in Washington?The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB) has tried to address this gap by providing growers with  a list of pesticides that may be used by marijuana growers, along with an explanation of the criteria used to select the pesticides.

These pesticides were selected because their use on marijuana plants would not be in direct conflict with federal law (they are allowed on other food products) and they are considered to pose minimal risk to health when used as directed.

Marijuana retailers are required to document all pesticides used on marijuana products that they sell and provide customers and regulators the information on pesticides used upon request.

The potential for pesticides to be present in marijuana is not new and was a concern before the legalization and regulation of medicinal and recreational marijuana products. Pesticides can pose a risk not only to marijuana users but also to workers who use the products and to the environment.

We don’t know that the problem is worse at this time than before regulation, and given the fact that there are now requirements for growers regarding acceptable pesticide use in  marijuana sold by regulated stores (and soon to include “medicinal marijuana” sold at regulated stores) the risk may be lower at this time than in the past. Continue reading


NCI funds $3.1M Fred Hutch trial of a smoking-cessation app


Screen Shot 2015-06-19 at 11.35.43 AMDr. Jonathan Bricker, a behavioral scientist at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington, has received a $3.1 million, five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute to conduct a randomized, controlled clinical trial of SmartQuit, a smoking-cessation smartphone app.

The new trial follows on the heels of a pilot randomized trial of SmartQuit he conducted in collaboration with UW and 2Morrow Mobile – the first randomized, controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of smoking-cessation programs delivered via mobile apps.

Bricker studies acceptance and commitment therapy, or ACT, to help people quit smoking and other unhealthy behaviors. Unlike traditional quit-smoking approaches, which focus on willpower and avoiding one’s urges to smoke, ACT focuses on increasing one’s willingness to accept the physical, mental and emotional challenges of quitting while also encouraging commitment to engage in values-based behavior change. For more about ACT, see his TEDxRainier talk.



Want to quit smoking? There’s an app for that!



QuitGuide is a free smartphone app that can help you:

  • track your cravings and moods,
  • monitor your progress toward achieving smokefree milestones,
  • identify your reasons for quitting,
  • identify smoking triggers and develop strategies to deal with them,
  • provide guidance on quitting smoking, and a variety of other strategies to help you successfully become and stay smokefree.

QuitGuide is a product of (SfG)—a smoking cessation resource created by the Tobacco Control Research Branch at the National Cancer Institute in collaboration with tobacco control professionals and smoking cessation experts and with input from ex-smokers.

QuitGuide provides tips to use during cravings. Use these tips to help you manage your mood and stay smokefree. To get more tips and support, you can also visit the website.



King County teen e-cigarette use is on the rise, but fewer smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol


Map of SeattleFrom Public Health – Seattle & King County

Most King County youth are heeding public health prevention warnings about cigarette smoking and drinking and driving, according to new, preliminary results from the Healthy Youth Survey.

However, e-cigarettes use among youth is increasing.

One in five King County high school seniors reports vaping or e-cigarette use, which is double the number that smokes cigarettes. Continue reading


Trying to quit smoking? There’s an app for that.


smartquitThe state Department of Health is offering a smartphone app to help Washingtonians kick their tobacco habits, and the first 1,900 app downloads are free.

SmartQuit follows a unique program created at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center to help people become tobacco-free.

A study conducted by the Seattle cancer research center found that SmartQuit users were two-to-three times more likely to kick their nicotine addiction than those who tried to quit on their own.

The first 1,900 app downloads are free.

The program’s strategy is to teach participants to accept and master their cravings, rather than ignore or replace those urges.

“Quitting tobacco is one of the best things a person can do for their health,” said Joella Pyatt, cessation coordinator at the Department of Health, “and we want to give people the tools they need to succeed. Tobacco related illnesses are still one of the top killers in our state.”

The agency is offering 1,900 free downloads through funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

People must complete an online survey before receiving a code that provides access to a version of the app that is unique to the state health department.

The app can be purchased for $49.99 after the free codes are given out, and will be available in the iTunes and Android app stores.


Public Health asks court to stop two hookah bars from violating smoking law


Photo courtesy of Solix via Wikipedia

From Public Health – Seattle & King County

Public Health – Seattle & King County has filed papers in King County Superior Court asking the court to stop two hookah bars for exposing employees and the public to tobacco smoke in violation of Washington’s Smoking in Public Places Act and local Board of Health Code.

The request for an injunction was filed against The Night Owl in Seattle’s University District and Medina Hookah Lounge in south Seattle.

A hookah is a glass pipe filled with water that is used for smoking flavored tobacco, often by several people at once.

During a typical 45-minute session of hookah use, a person may inhale as much smoke, tobacco and carcinogens as smoking 100 cigarettes or more.

Smoking in public places law

Washington’s Smoking in Public Places law was passed by voters in 2005 and prohibits smoking in public places and places of employment. The local Board of Health code mirrors the state law and includes provisions that prohibit the use of electronic smoking devices.

Hookah bars have claimed that they are exempt from the indoor smoking law because they are private clubs. However, smoking is prohibited by law if an establishment has employees and/or the club is open to the public.

A previous ruling by a King County Hearing Examiner on February 12, 2014 found that both the Night Owl and Medina are open to the public, operating similarly to night clubs that charge a cover for admission.

“Hookah smoke is as addictive as traditional cigarettes”, said Patty Hayes, Interim Director, Public Health- Seattle & King County. “Asking the court for an injunction is a measure of last resort, but it is necessary now to ensure all our businesses are protecting the health of employees and the public.” Continue reading


Teen prescription opioid abuse, cigarette, and alcohol use down, but e-cigarette use up


Two white tabletsFrom the US Department of Health and Human Services

Use of cigarettes, alcohol, and abuse of prescription pain relievers among teens has declined since 2013 while marijuana use rates were stable, according to the 2014 Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey, released today by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). However, use of e-cigarettes, measured in the report for the first time, is high.

These 2014 results are part of an overall two-decade trend among the nation’s youth. The MTF survey measures drug use and attitudes among eighth, 10th, and 12th graders, is funded by NIDA, and is conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. NIDA is part of the National Institutes of Health.

“With the rates of many drugs decreasing, and the rates of marijuana use appearing to level off, it is possible that prevention efforts are having an effect,” said NIDA Director Nora D. Volkow, M.D.

Continue reading


The great e-cig debate


Fred Hutch and SCCA experts weigh in on the good, bad and ugly of the electronic cigarette quandary

By Diane Mapes / Fred Hutch News Service

Jenny McCarthy

TV personality Jenny McCarthy is a paid spokesperson for Blu eCigs. Photo by Blu eCigs

Since electronic cigarettes were introduced to the world a decade ago, they have grabbed headlines, frustrated physicians and thoroughly confused consumers.

“Our patients are highly motivated to quit, but they’re confused about the mixed messages of e-cigarettes,” said Donna Manders, a certified tobacco treatment specialist at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. “A lot of them believe the hype that is out there, that these must be safe because they’re being sold everywhere.”

Unfortunately, there are far more advertisements, celebrity spokesmodels (like anti-vaccine advocate Jenny McCarthy) and new brands of e-cigs than strong, evidence-based studies.

“There’s a lot of excitement but very little data,” said Jonathan Bricker, psychologist and smoking cessation researcher in the Public Health Sciences division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. “The FDA has to regulate the device before a researcher can conduct a trial on its efficacy for smoking cessation and the devices aren’t regulated yet. We’re in a Catch-22.” Continue reading


How to protect your children from cancer – CDC


Cancer Prevention Starts in Childhood

Tips from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Photo of two parents and three children sitting outside

You can reduce your children’s risk of getting cancer later in life.

Start by helping them adopt a healthy lifestyle with good eating habits and plenty of exercise to keep a healthy weight.

Then follow the tips below to help prevent specific kinds of cancer. Continue reading


Women’s Health – Week 41: Quitting Smoking


tacuin womenFrom the Office of Research on Women’s Health

Quitting smoking If you stop using tobacco, you could greatly improve your health. Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States.

Smoking causes most cancers of the larynx (voice box), oral cavity (mouth) and pharynxesophagusbladderkidney, stomach, and cervix.

Tobacco smoke contains chemicals that are harmful. Health care providers know that at least 250 of the 4,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke are harmful.

If you smoke, your risk of developing smoking-related diseases, such as lung and other cancers, heart disease, stroke, and respiratory illnesses, increase with each additional year you smoke. Continue reading