Category Archives: Addiction

Q&A: Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin on attacking the drug epidemic


VermontBy Elaine S. Povich

In January 2014, Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin devoted his entire State of the State address to the opiate drug scourge ravaging his state. While Vermont is not the only state to experience the growing addiction problem, it arguably has been the most aggressive in tackling one aspect of it — offering treatment to residents who agree to participate.

Gov. Shumlin

Gov. Shumlin

Within six months of his speech, Shumlin, a Democrat, signed bills and executive orders that included $6.7 million for a “hub and spoke” treatment program of central facilities and small treatment outposts, a medication-assisted addiction therapy program, tougher sentences for drug traffickers and new regulations for prescribing and monitoring prescription drugs. One of biggest changes is giving people who are picked up by police the choice of treatment instead of criminal prosecution.

In January 2015, the state reported that medically assisted drug treatment had increased by 40 percent. Of those who completed treatment plans, 75 percent showed improved functioning. But the report also said more treatment opportunities are needed, citing the difficulty in hiring and retaining clinicians and other health care providers as a major obstacle.

A year and a half after his groundbreaking speech, Stateline checked in with Shumlin to talk about his progress and what remains to be done. Continue reading


When rehab might help an addict, but insurance won’t cover it – WITF-Fm


Federal law requires insurance firms to cover treatment for addiction as they do treatment for other diseases. But some families say many drug users aren’t getting the inpatient care they need.

Cris and Valerie Fiore hold one of their favorite pictures of their sons Anthony (with the dark hair) and Nick. Anthony died from a heroin overdose in May 2014 at the age of 24. Cris Fiore’s eulogy described his son’s death as a shock, but “not a surprise.” Anthony had been addicted to heroin for years.


Americans are drinking more heavily, especially women


whiskey-glassBy Barbara Feder Ostrov

Whether quaffing artisanal cocktails at hipster bars or knocking back no-name beers on the couch, more Americans are drinking heavily – and engaging in episodes of binge-drinking, concludes a major study of alcohol use.

Heavy drinking among Americans rose 17.2 percent between 2005 and 2012, largely due to rising rates among women, according to the study by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, published Thursday in the American Journal of Public Health.

Over the course of the decade, the rate of binge drinking among women increased more than seven times the rate among men, a UW study has found.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines heavy drinking as exceeding an average of one drink per day during the past month for women and two drinks per day for men.

Binge drinking is defined as four or more drinks for women and five or more drinks for men on a single occasion at least once during the past month.

The increases are driven largely by women’s drinking habits as social norms change, researchers found. Continue reading


Most states list deadly methadone as a ‘preferred drug’


465px-Methadone.svgBy Christine Vestal

The federal government has been issuing warnings about the dangers of methadone for nearly a decade.

Two years ago, states started removing it from their Medicaid “preferred drug lists.” (Joe Amon/Getty Images)

As prescription drug overdose deaths soar nationwide, most states have failed to take a simple step that would make it harder for doctors to prescribe the deadliest of all narcotics.

Methadone is four times as likely to cause an overdose death as oxycodone, and more than twice as likely as morphine, yet as many as 33 states make it easy for doctors to prescribe. 

Methadone overdoses kill about 5,000 people every year, six times as many as in the late 1990s, when it was prescribed almost exclusively for use in hospitals and addiction clinics where it is tightly controlled.

It is four times as likely to cause an overdose death as oxycodone, and more than twice as likely as morphine. In addition, experts say it is the most addictive of all opiates.

Yet as many as 33 states make it easy for doctors to prescribe the pain medicine to Medicaid patients, no questions asked. Continue reading


Want to quit smoking? There’s an app for that!



QuitGuide is a free smartphone app that can help you:

  • track your cravings and moods,
  • monitor your progress toward achieving smokefree milestones,
  • identify your reasons for quitting,
  • identify smoking triggers and develop strategies to deal with them,
  • provide guidance on quitting smoking, and a variety of other strategies to help you successfully become and stay smokefree.

QuitGuide is a product of (SfG)—a smoking cessation resource created by the Tobacco Control Research Branch at the National Cancer Institute in collaboration with tobacco control professionals and smoking cessation experts and with input from ex-smokers.

QuitGuide provides tips to use during cravings. Use these tips to help you manage your mood and stay smokefree. To get more tips and support, you can also visit the website.



Overdoses due to the painkiller fentanyl prompt nationwide alert


Alert IconFrom the US Drug Enforcement Administration

The United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) today issued a nationwide alert about the dangers posed by abuse with the synthetic opioid painkiller fentanyl.

The drug, which is commonly added to heroin, has been associated with a marked increase in overdoses and deaths as abuse of heroin has increased in recent years, the DEA said.

“Drug incidents and overdoses related to fentanyl are occurring at an alarming rate throughout the United States and represent a significant threat to public health and safety,” said DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart. “Often laced in heroin, fentanyl and fentanyl analogues produced in illicit clandestine labs are up to 100 times more powerful than morphine and 30-50 times more powerful than heroin.”

In the last two years, DEA has seen a significant resurgence in fentanyl-related seizures and last year state and local drug-testing labs reported 3,344 fentanyl submissions, up from 942 in 2013. Continue reading


King County teen e-cigarette use is on the rise, but fewer smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol


Map of SeattleFrom Public Health – Seattle & King County

Most King County youth are heeding public health prevention warnings about cigarette smoking and drinking and driving, according to new, preliminary results from the Healthy Youth Survey.

However, e-cigarettes use among youth is increasing.

One in five King County high school seniors reports vaping or e-cigarette use, which is double the number that smokes cigarettes. Continue reading


Drugs: Heroin Overdose Deaths in U.S. Have Tripled Since 2010 – Bloomberg Business


320px-HeroinMore than 8,200 Americans—an average of 23 people each day—died of heroin overdoses in 2013. That’s according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and it’s the latest evidence that the nation’s heroin problem is becoming more severe. The rate of overdose deaths in 2013, the CDC report states, is almost triple what it was in 2010.

via Drugs: Heroin Overdose Deaths in U.S. Have Tripled Since 2010 – Bloomberg Business.