Category Archives: Safety

Fast currents, frigid temps make local water dangerous this time of year

Share

From the Washington State Department of Health

Mountain Stream

Cold and fast waters can be a recipe for drowning and state health officials remind folks that even though the calendar says it’s close to Memorial Day, water temperatures are frigid and river flows are swift.

Springtime river flow is high and swift from rain and snow melt and can easily overwhelm the strongest swimmer.

Many Washingtonians wait for hot weather to dip their toes into lakes, rivers, and the ocean surf, but other people brave the frosty waters and hop into boats, inner tubes, and other floating equipment in search of a late-spring water adventure.

Being unprepared for the freezing water temperatures or the swift flow of the waters can lead to tragedy. Continue reading

Share

Planning on going on a cruise? Check in here first.

Share

Screen Shot 2015-05-21 at 11.20.45 AMThe independent investigative journalism website ProPublica has set up a webpage where you can search a database of over 300 cruise ships that make port in the U.S., where you are able to see their health and safety records going back as far as 2010, as well as their current position and deck plans.

To search the database, go here.

 

Share

Washington state ranked most bicycle-friendly state

Share

Road BikeWashington has again been ranked the most bicycle-friendly state by the League of American Bicyclists. But the we better not get complacent, the league warns:

Although Washington State has been #1 for the past 8 years, the gap between #1 and #2 (Minnesota) has steadily decreased since 2013. The Washington

State Department of Transportation should build upon its past successes by increasing staff capacity for planning, engineering, and implementation of solutions that make bicycling and walking safer and more convenient.

To learn more go here.

Share

Free child car seat check-up events in King County

Share

Child safety seat car seat From Public Health – Seattle & King County

Child safety seats can save lives, but they need to be used properly to be effective.

Parents and caregivers can get support in fitting their children securely in car seats at five free child car seat check-up events in upcoming months, beginning Friday, April 24, 2015. Public Health – Seattle & King County is hosting the events.

Event details

Parents and caregivers will have their child safety seat checked by a certified child safety seat technician for safe installation and educational materials will be on hand. Soon-to-be parents and caregivers are welcome as well.

These events are ones of many ongoing child safety seat check-up events in the Puget Sound area. Check the Washington Safety Restraint Coalition website for locations and schedules. Continue reading

Share

Getting warmer: let’s talk water safety

Share

infant-swimming

By James Apa
Public Health – Seattle & King County

With summer approaching in the Northwest, layers of clothing slowly peel away, and thoughts turn to the water. Soon, local rivers, lakes and pools will start to fill with kids and families.

I talked with Tony Gomez, our Violence and Injury Prevention Manager (and local water safety guru), to understand potential hazards on the water, and how to keep these experiences fun and safe. 

Q: Every year, we hear local reports of tragic drownings in the news. How common are they, and where do most happen?

A: Last year, we had 15 unintentional drowning deaths in King County, and we see about 100 statewide per year. From when I started this work 30 years ago, drownings have dropped significantly, in large part because of good prevention work. But it’s still too many. Continue reading

Share

Why I love family-run restaurants: Insights from a food inspector

Share

cropped-eyob-in-idBy Eyob Mazengia, PhD, RS, Food Protection Program
Public Health – Seattle & King County

When I started as a food inspector, I was assigned to the International District. And I liked it. It was almost like walking into a new culture, a new era.

What fascinated me was that as a public health worker, I had permission to walk into people’s personal spaces. I liked the smells, the sounds of their languages, their wall hangings and the way things looked.

It was a privilege, really, to be allowed into their personal spaces. Going on food inspections in the I.D., it was like walking into 3-4 different countries every day, without traveling outside the neighborhood.

Over the years, I established good relationships with the restaurant establishments. They were no longer just restaurant operators—they were mothers, fathers, grown kids. They’re not just businesses—there’s a family behind every door, people who had often gone through difficult times to be here.

And as I got to know them, I could recognize the sacrifices they made to give their children better opportunities in the U.S., and what they left behind. Even those born and raised here, you could recognize the sacrifices they were making. Continue reading

Share

Standing up to senior falls: local program promotes independence and safety at home

Share

By Alan Abe, Emergency Medical Services Division
Public Health – Seattle & King County

ems-falls

Do you know someone over 65 who has fallen? Have you reached that age and are concerned about your risk?

Senior falls are all too common, with results that are often serious and sometime even grave.

Nearly 24,000 seniors died nationally in 2012 due to falls, nearly doubling in ten years. And over 2.4 million people – almost four times the population of Seattle – were hospitalized.

What’s driving this toppling trend? More of us are living longer, and as a society, we’re getting older. And with the aging of the baby boomer generation, this trend will continue.  By 2030, the US Census Bureau estimates that there could be about 75 million people over 65 in the United States.

As we age, we tend to collect conditions that make us more vulnerable to falls: diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis and Parkinson’s disease.

So, what can we do about it? We know that 60% of senior falls happen in the home, so if we improve safety and reduce risks there, we can make a big difference.

That’s where King County Emergency Medical Services/Medic One comes in. They have developed the One Step Ahead Fall Prevention Program to help at-risk seniors stay healthy, independent and safe in their homes.

How does the program work? Continue reading

Share

Public health appoints new interim Local Health Officer

Share
Duchin

Jeffrey Duchin

Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, MD, was appointed today as Interim Local Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County.

Duchin is a familiar figure in the health field, having held the position of chief of the department’s Communicable Disease Epidemiology and Immunization Section since 1999 and frequently serving as a department spokesperson.

In his new role, Duchin will provide leadership in developing priorities and setting strategies for the health department, with a particular role as the key science advisor on program and policy development.

Duchin will split time between his Health Officer duties and his continued direction of communicable disease and immunization activities. He will also maintain an affiliation with the University of Washington as a Professor of Medicine.

As part of his Health Officer duties, he will work with other health officers in Washington State on health issues that cross county borders.

In addition, Duchin will represent Public Health – Seattle & King County on external committees, task forces, and as a liaison to regional and national professional organizations.

Duchin’s is currently the Chair of the Public Health Committee of the Infectious Disease Society of America and has served in many other advisory roles, including the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the Institute of Medicine.

The Interim Local Health Officer reports to Patty Hayes, Interim Director of Public Health – Seattle & King County.  Prior to Duchin, the position was held by the previous Director, Dr. David Fleming.

Share

Locking up firearms to prevent suicide

Share

GunBy Tony Gomez, BS, RS, Manager, Violence and Injury Prevention
Public Health — Seattle & King County

I’ve worked on Violence and Injury Prevention for over thirty years. I consistently notice in the media and in conversations about firearms that usually the discussion focuses on tragic homicides.

But, the truth is that most firearm deaths are suicides—often hidden from the public conversation. In King County, nearly 70% of firearm deaths being suicides, it’s crucial we come together despite different ideologies.

The truth is that most firearm deaths are suicides.

There are numerous entities including King County that have a deep commitment to suicide prevention and are working together to address this “silent” killer of our residents.

With firearm ownership so prevalent in King County (~25%) – and some estimated 30,000 households that keep at least one firearm loaded and unlocked – we can’t afford to wait any longer to get those easily stolen and accessed firearms locked up.

We know that impulsivity plays a significant role in suicide attempts; easy access to highly lethal means, such as firearms, increases risk.  Strong evidence exists, both in the United States and abroad, that restricting access to lethal means is an effective way to reduce suicide.

Suicide prevention efforts in King County and elsewhere in the United States now champion safe storage of firearms. Continue reading

Share

Food inspection grades: A – B – C , easy as 1 – 2 – 3 … or is it?

Share

EatBy hilarykaraszkc
Public Health Insider: Behind-the-scenes of the agency protecting the health and well-being of all people in Seattle & King County

New York City has them, so does L.A. Even Toronto has them. So why aren’t there food safety inspection grades posted outside of restaurants in King County?

The answer? Food safety performance placarding is coming, and when it does, it will give patrons and establishments alike information that is meaningful, clear, and motivating.

Diners need to know actual risk

There’s a lot on the line: Studies show that restaurant placards influence consumer behavior. But research on the systems that give A-B-C grades shows that A-B-C placards don’t communicate what consumers are expect. Continue reading

Share

Texting, talking and walking – distracted pedestrian injuries jump

Share

texting walking iPhone cell phone mobileBy Tim Henderson
Stateline

They walk in front of cars, and into tree limbs and street signs. They fall off curbs and bridges into wet cement and creek beds.

They are distracted walkers who, while calling or texting on mobile phones, have suffered cuts and bruises, sustained serious head injuries or even been killed.

As many cities and states promote walkable neighborhoods, in part to attract more young people, some also are levying fines on distracted walkers and lowering speed limits to make streets gentler for the inattentive.

Pedestrian injuries due to cell phone use are up 35 percent since 2010, according to federal emergency room data reviewed by Stateline, and some researchers blame at least 10 percent of the 78,000 pedestrian injuries in the U.S. in 2012 on mobile device distraction.

texting walking graphic

The federal Fatality Analysis Reporting system attributes about a half-dozen pedestrians deaths a year to “portable electronic devices,” including phones and music players.

Continue reading

Share

More than half of U.S. infants sleep with unsafe bedding

Share

From the National Institutes of Health

NIH, CDC study shows unsafe infant bedding use still common, despite warnings

Alert IconNearly 55 percent of U.S. infants are placed to sleep with bedding that increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, despite recommendations against the practice, report researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other institutions.

Soft objects and loose bedding — such as thick blankets, quilts, and pillows — can obstruct an infant’s airway and pose a suffocation risk, according to the NIH’s Safe to Sleep campaign.

Soft bedding has also been shown to increase the risk of SIDS Infants should be placed to sleep alone, on their backs, on a firm sleep surface, such as in a mattress in a safety-approved crib, covered by a fitted sheet. Soft objects, toys, crib bumpers, quilts, comforters and loose bedding should be kept out of the baby’s sleep area.

Parents have good intentions but may not understand that blankets, quilts and pillows increase a baby’s risk of SIDS and accidental suffocation.”—Carrie K. Shapiro-Mendoza, Ph.D.

Based on responses from nearly 20,000 caregivers, the researchers reported that, although such potentially unsafe bedding use declined from 85.9 percent in 1993-1995, it still remained high, at 54.7 percent, in 2008-2010.

“Parents have good intentions but may not understand that blankets, quilts and pillows increase a baby’s risk of SIDS and accidental suffocation,” said the study’s first author, Carrie K. Shapiro-Mendoza, Ph.D., M.P.H., senior scientist in the CDC’s Division of Reproductive Health in Atlanta.  Continue reading

Share

Sign up to receive Flood Alerts! Or get the app!

Share

King County Flood Alert App

King County is offering free Flood Alerts to help keep you informed of flood conditions you can sign up for phone or text messages — or get an app.

  • Get Alerts by e-mail and/or phone (voice or text messages)
  • Select the rivers that affect you
  • Select the flood phase levels of interest to you.

 Make sure you get alerted in an emergency!

Share