Category Archives: Product Recall

CRF Frozen Foods of Pasco Washington issues massive recall of its frozen vegetables due to Listeria concern

Share

Recall includes approximately 358 consumer products sold under 42 separate brands sold in all fifty U.S. states and the Canadian Provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan.

Screen Shot 2016-05-03 at 3.38.59 PMAs a precaution, CRF Frozen Foods of Pasco, Washington is expanding its voluntary recall of frozen organic and traditional fruits and vegetables.

We are performing this voluntary recall in cooperation with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) because these products have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The organism can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.

Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, Listeriainfection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

This expanded recall of frozen vegetables includes all of the frozen organic and traditional fruit and vegetable products manufactured or processed in CRF Frozen Foods’ Pasco facility since May 1, 2014.

All affected products have the best by dates or sell by dates between April 26, 2016 and April 26, 2018. These include approximately 358 consumer products sold under 42 separate brands, the details of which are listed below.

Products include organic and non-organic broccoli, butternut squash, carrots, cauliflower, corn, edamame, green beans, Italian beans, kale, leeks, lima beans, onions, peas, pepper strips, potatoes, potato medley, root medley, spinach, sweet potatoes, various vegetable medleys, blends, and stir fry packages, blueberries, cherries, cranberries, peaches, raspberries, and strawberries. For a complete list of affected products go here. Continue reading

Share

Wonderful Pistachios recalled due to Salmonella concerns

Share

From the Washington State Department of Health

Wonderful Pistachios Orders Recall Due to Risk of Salmonella Contamination

Screen Shot 2016-03-10 at 12.20.46 PMOLYMPIA — Wonderful Pistachios announced yesterday the recall of a limited number of flavors and sizes of in-shell and shelled pistachios here in Washington because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.

Nine states reported having 11 people infected with Salmonella. Two of the 11 people are from Washington.

The pistachios were sold under the brand names Wonderful, Paramount Farms, and Trader Joe’s, and can be identified by a lot code number on the lower back or bottom panel of the package.

A table of recalled products is available on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s Recall & Advice to Consumers and Retailers web page.

“Salmonella is very serious, and it is important that people take the proper steps to reduce their risk of infection,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Scott Lindquist.

lot-code-image

Click to go to a list of the recalled lots.

It is recommended that consumers do not eat and retailers do not sell recalled pistachios produced by Wonderful Pistachios.

Contact your health care provider if you think you may have become ill from eating this product. More information about Salmonella can be found on the DOH’s Salmonella web page.

Information about the recall is also available on the company’s web page.

Share

Costco chicken salad connected to King County E. Coli case

Share

E coli - Photo NIAIDBy Lindsay Bosslet
Public Health – Seattle & King County

The Washington State Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in conjunction with local health officials, are currently investigating a cluster of E. coli O157:H7 cases that has been connected to Costco chicken salad.

One case has been reported in Washington state. This person, a King County resident, is a teen male who was not hospitalized. He reported eating the implicated product, which he purchased from the Shoreline Costco.

For more information on this outbreak, read this press release from Washington State Department of Health.

If you purchased this product (number 37719) from a Washington Costco, discard it and do not eat it.

People who have eaten this product and feel ill should consult with their health care provider. People usually get sick 2-8 days after getting E. coli.

PHOTO: E coli courtesy of National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease

Share

Washington firm recalls 116,000 pounds of whole hogs due to Salmonella concerns.

Share

Alert IconFrom the US Department of Agriculture

Kapowsin Meats of Graham, Washington, is recalling approximately 116,262 pounds of whole hogs that may be contaminated with Salmonella, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The “Whole Hogs for Barbecue” item were produced on various dates between April 18, 2015 and July 27, 2015. The following products are subject to recall:

On July 15, 2015, the Washington State Department of Health notified FSIS of an investigation of Salmonella  illnesses. Working in conjunction with the Washington State Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), FSIS determined that there is a link between whole hogs for barbeque from Kapowsin Meats and these illnesses.

Traceback investigation has identified 32 case-patients who consumed whole hogs for barbeque from this establishment prior to illness onset. These illnesses are part of a larger illness investigation.

Based on epidemiological evidence, 134 case-patients have been identified in Washington with illness onset dates ranging from April 25, 2015 to July 29, 2015. FSIS continues to work with our public health partners on this ongoing investigation.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days.

Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume pork and whole hogs for barbeque that have been cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 145° F with a three minute rest time.

The only way to confirm that whole hogs for barbeque are cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature, http://1.usa.gov/1cDxcDQ.

For whole hogs for barbeque make sure to check the internal temperature with a food thermometer in several places. Check the temperature frequently and replenish wood or coals to make sure the fire stays hot. Remove only enough meat from the carcass as you can serve within 1-2 hours.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact John Anderson, Owner, at (253) 847-1777.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

PREPARING PRODUCT FOR SAFE CONSUMPTION

USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline
1-888-MPHOTLINE or visit 
www.fsis.usda.gov

Wash hands with soap water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry. Also, wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Clean spills immediately.

Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use one cutting board for raw meat, poultry and egg products and a separate one for fresh produce and cooked foods.

Color is NOT a reliable indicator that meat has been cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria.

The only way to be sure the meat or poultry is cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer to measure the internal temperature.

  • Beef, Pork, Lamb, &Veal (steaks, roasts, chops): 145°F with a three minute rest time
  • Ground meat: 160°F
  • Whole poultry, poultry breasts, & ground poultry: 165°F
  • Fish: 145°F

Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase or one hour if temperatures exceed 90º F. Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking.

Share

Listeria outbreak linked to Latin-style soft cheeses

Share

Pregnant women, newborns and adults with weakened immune systems most at risk

cheeseWashington State health and agriculture officials are working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on an ongoing outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections linked to consumption of Latin-style soft cheese produced by Queseria Bendita, a Yakima, Washington firm. 

As of January 16, 2015, a total of three cases have been identified from Washington in King, Pierce and Yakima counties. One illness was pregnancy-associated, two people were hospitalized and one death was reported.

The affected products made by the Yakima-based Queseria Bendita are subject to a voluntary recall and the firm has stopped producing cheese.

Health officials are warning consumers who may have purchased these three Queseria Bendita brand cheeses: Queso Fresco, Panela, and Requeson and still have it in their refrigerators to throw the product away and not eat it. Grocery stores and distributors should pull and not sell these products.  Continue reading

Share

Snoqualmie Ice Cream Voluntary Recall

Share

snoqualmieSnoqualmie Gourmet Ice Cream, Inc. has issued a voluntary recall of all ice cream, gelato, custard and sorbet for all flavors and container sizes produced on or after January 1, 2014 until December 15, 2014 because these products have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The ice cream, gelato, custard and sorbet were distributed in Arizona, Idaho, California, Oregon, and Washington may have been further distributed and sold in various retail outlets in Alaska, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming. Continue reading

Share

Avoid powdered pure caffeine, FDA warns.

Share

From the US Food and Drug Administration

The FDA is warning about powdered pure caffeine being marketed directly to consumers, and recommends avoiding these products.

In particular, FDA is concerned about powdered pure caffeine sold in bulk bags over the internet.

The FDA is aware of at least one death of a teenager who used these products.

1000px-Main_symptoms_of_Caffeine_overdose

These products are essentially 100 percent caffeine. A single teaspoon of pure caffeine is roughly equivalent to the amount in 25 cups of coffee.

Continue reading

Share

Inks found in certain tattoo kits cause infections – FDA

Share

tatoo inkConsumer Update from the US Food and Drug Administration

Tempted to get a tattoo? Today, people from all walks of life have tattoos, which might lead you to believe that tattoos are completely safe.

But beware—there may be associated health risks.

Recently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) became aware of a problem after testing inks in home use tattoo kits marketed by White and Blue Lion, Inc. FDA has confirmed bacterial contamination in unopened bottles of the company’s inks.

White and Blue Lion, Inc. recalled contaminated products on July 11, 2014, but FDA is still concerned that tattoo artists may be using contaminated inks from other distributors.

According to Linda Katz, M.D., M.P.H., director of FDA’s Office of Cosmetics and Colors, using these inks for tattoos could cause infection.

“FDA has confirmed one case of skin infection involving a consumer that used this company’s tattoo products,” Katz says, “and we are aware of other reports linked to tattoo products with similar packaging.”

Risks Can Be Severe

Continue reading

Share
costco berries thumbnail

Hepatitis A case in Thurston County linked to frozen berries sold at Costco

Share
Costco berries

‘Townsend Farms Organic Anti-Oxidant Blend’ frozen berries have been linked the outbreak.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now believes there has been at least one case of hepatitis A illness in Washington State that may be linked to frozen berries sold at Costco.

“The probable case in our state is a man from Thurston County who was sick in March and has recovered,” the Washington State Department of Health reports.

The national outbreak now lists 79 cases in eight states linked to the product marketed as “Townsend Farms Organic Anti-Oxidant Blend” frozen berry and pomegranate mix.

According to the label, the brand contained products originating from the U.S., Argentina, Chile, and Turkey.

The product was also sold at Harris Teeter stores, the CDC reports, however, no cases have been identified that bought the product at Harris Teeter at this time.

For advice for consumers about the outbreak go to the CDC website.

The Department of Health advises against eating these berries and recommends discarding any remaining product from your freezers:

Even if some of the product has been eaten without anyone in your home becoming ill, the rest of the product should be discarded.

Contact your health care provider right away if you have eaten these berries and develop yellow eyes or skin, abdominal pain, diarrhea, pale stools, or dark urine. Symptoms can start up to seven weeks from the time of exposure.

If you consumed this product in the last two weeks and have never been vaccinated for hepatitis A or had the disease, contact your health care provider to find out if you should be vaccinated or receive other treatment.

If you have already received the hepatitis A vaccination in the past or had hepatitis A, you are unlikely to become ill with the disease.

People without a health care provider may contact the local health agency in their community. If it’s too late for a hepatitis A shot, be sure to wash hands thoroughly after using the toilet and don’t prepare food for others if you have diarrhea.

Follow this advice even if you get the vaccine in time. The latest information about the national hepatitis A outbreak is available on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

Share

E. coli outbreak leads to expanded recall of frozen food products

Share

Alert Icon with Exclamation Point!The Washington State Department of Health is warning people that several types of frozen food products – Farm Rich, Market Day, and Schwan’s brands – have been recalled due to possible contamination with E. coli.

 

The products were distributed widely throughout Washington.

The recalls are related to a national E. coli outbreak that sickened 27 people from 15 states, including a Pierce County woman in her 20s.

“The foods in this recall were sent to stores throughout our state,” said Dave Gifford, Food Safety program manager. “E. coli can be very serious. We’re asking people to look at the recall list, check their freezers carefully, and throw out any of these products that they find.”

The type of E. coli in this outbreak is a strain of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O121 (STEC O121), which is similar to E. coli O157:H7.

It can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. It can sometimes result in severe, life-threatening illness.

The recalled product list continues to expand and now includes several varieties of frozen snacks and mini-meal products.

The full list of the products currently covered by the recall is on the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s website; more info is on the Food Safety Program website.

Share

6 Tip-offs to rip-offs: Don’t fall for health fraud scams

Share

Miracle cureBogus product! Danger! Health fraud alert!

You’ll never see these warnings on health products, but that’s what you ought to be thinking when you see claims like “miracle cure,” “revolutionary scientific breakthrough,” or “alternative to drugs or surgery.”

Health fraud scams have been around for hundreds of years. The snake oil salesmen of old have morphed into the deceptive, high-tech marketers of today. They prey on people’s desires for easy solutions to difficult health problems—from losing weight to curing serious diseases like cancer.

According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a health product is fraudulent if it is deceptively promoted as being effective against a disease or health condition but has not been scientifically proven safe and effective for that purpose.

Scammers promote their products through newspapers, magazines, TV infomercials and cyberspace. You can find health fraud scams in retail stores and on countless websites, in popup ads and spam, and on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.

Not Worth the Risk

Health fraud scams can do more than waste your money. They can cause serious injury or even death, says Gary Coody, R.Ph., FDA’s national health fraud coordinator. “Using unproven treatments can delay getting a potentially life-saving diagnosis and medication that actually works. Also, fraudulent products sometimes contain hidden drug ingredients that can be harmful when unknowingly taken by consumers.”

Coody says fraudulent products often make claims related to:

  • weight loss
  • sexual performance
  • memory loss
  • serious diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer’s

A Pervasive Problem

Fraudulent products not only won’t work—they could cause serious injury. In the past few years, FDA laboratories have found more than 100 weight-loss products, illegally marketed as dietary supplements, that contained sibutramine, the active ingredient in the prescription weight-loss drug Meridia. In 2010, Meridia was withdrawn from the U.S. market after studies showed that it was associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

Fraudulent products marketed as drugs or dietary supplements are not the only health scams on the market. FDA found a fraudulent and expensive light therapy device with cure-all claims to treat fungal meningitis, Alzheimer’s, skin cancer, concussions and many other unrelated diseases. Generally, making health claims about a medical device without FDA clearance or approval of the device is illegal.

“Health fraud is a pervasive problem,” says Coody, “especially when scammers sell online. It’s difficult to track down the responsible parties. When we do find them and tell them their products are illegal, some will shut down their website. Unfortunately, however, these same products may reappear later on a different website, and sometimes may reappear with a different name.”

Tip-Offs

FDA offers some tip-offs to help you identify rip-offs.

  • One product does it all. Be suspicious of products that claim to cure a wide range of diseases. A New York firm claimed its products marketed as dietary supplements could treat or cure senile dementia, brain atrophy, atherosclerosis, kidney dysfunction, gangrene, depression, osteoarthritis, dysuria, and lung, cervical and prostate cancer. In October 2012, at FDA’s request, U.S. marshals seized these products.
  • Personal testimonials. Success stories, such as, “It cured my diabetes” or “My tumors are gone,” are easy to make up and are not a substitute for scientific evidence.
  • Quick fixes. Few diseases or conditions can be treated quickly, even with legitimate products. Beware of language such as, “Lose 30 pounds in 30 days” or “eliminates skin cancer in days.”
  • “All natural.” Some plants found in nature (such as poisonous mushrooms) can kill when consumed. Moreover, FDA has found numerous products promoted as “all natural” but that contain hidden and dangerously high doses of prescription drug ingredients or even untested active artificial ingredients.
  • “Miracle cure.” Alarms should go off when you see this claim or others like it such as, “new discovery,” “scientific breakthrough” or “secret ingredient.” If a real cure for a serious disease were discovered, it would be widely reported through the media and prescribed by health professionals—not buried in print ads, TV infomercials or on Internet sites.
  • Conspiracy theories. Claims like “The pharmaceutical industry and the government are working together to hide information about a miracle cure” are always untrue and unfounded. These statements are used to distract consumers from the obvious, common-sense questions about the so-called miracle cure.

Even with these tips, fraudulent health products are not always easy to spot. If you’re tempted to buy an unproven product or one with questionable claims, check with your doctor or other health care professional first.

This article appears on FDA’s Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

March 4, 2013

Share
fda-logo-thumbnail

FDA Updates Safety Recommendations for Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

Share

An FDA Consumer Update

The US Food and Drug Administration has updated its safety information and recommendations to patients and health care professionals based on the agency’s current assessment of metal-on-metal hip implants, including:

  • the benefits and risks
  • the evaluation of published literature
  • the results of an FDA advisory panel meeting held in June 2012

Risk:

Implant components slide against each other during walking or running, which releases tiny metal particles. These particles may damage bone or soft tissue surrounding the implant and joint. Soft tissue damage could lead to pain, implant loosening, device failure and the need for revision surgery.

Some of the metal ions released will enter the bloodstream and travel to other parts of the body, where they may cause discomfort or illnesses.

Recommendations for People Considering a Metal-on-Metal Hip Implant

  • Be aware that every hip implant has benefits and risks.
  • Discuss your options for hip surgery with your orthopedic surgeon.

Recommendations for People With Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

  • If you are not having any symptoms and your orthopedic surgeon believes your implant is functioning properly, continue to follow-up routinely with the surgeon every one to two years.
  • If you develop new or worsening problems, such as pain, swelling, numbness, noise (popping, grinding, clicking or squeaking of your hip) or a change in your ability to walk, contact your orthopedic surgeon right away.
  • If you experience changes in your general health, including new or worsening symptoms outside your hip, let your doctor or other health care professional know you have a metal-on-metal hip implant.

For More Information

Enhanced by Zemanta
Share

5 things to know about breast implants

Share

A Consumer Update for the FDA

breast implantShould I get breast implants? Are there alternatives? Will they need to be replaced?

And if you decide to get implants, there are even more questions. Saline or silicone?  What style? How much monitoring is needed?

Researching breast implants can be overwhelming and confusing. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has online tools available to help women sort through the information and provides questions to consider before making the decision.

Know the Basics

FDA has approved implants for increasing breast size in women, for reconstruction after breast cancer surgery or trauma, and to correct developmental defects. Implants are also approved to correct or improve the result of a previous surgery.

A number of studies have reported that a majority of breast augmentation and reconstruction patients are satisfied with the results of their surgery.

FDA has approved two types of breast implants for sale in the U.S.: saline (salt water solution)-filled and silicone gel-filled. Both have a silicone outer shell and vary in size, shell thickness and shape.

Know the Risks

Silicone implants sold in the U.S. are made with medical-grade silicone.  These implants undergo extensive testing to establish reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness. Nonetheless, there are risks associated with all breast implants, including:

  • additional surgeries
  • capsular contracture—scar tissue that squeezes the implant
  • breast pain
  • rupture (tears or holes in the shell) with deflation of saline-filled implants
  • silent (without symptoms) rupture of silicone gel-filled implants

FDA experts suggest five things women should know about breast implants.

1. Breast implants are not lifetime devices.

The longer a woman has them, the greater the chances that she will develop complications, some of which will require more surgery.  The patient can also request additional surgeries to modify the aesthetic outcome, such as size or shape.

“The life of these devices varies according to the individual,” says Gretchen Burns, a nurse consultant at FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH).  “All women with implants will face additional surgeries—no one can tell them when.” While a few women have kept their original implants for 20-30 years, “that is not the common experience.”

2. Research products.

Review the patient labeling. FDA advises that women look at the Summary of Safety and Effectiveness Data (SSED) for each implant to learn about their characteristics and the fillers used. SSEDs have been produced for all approved saline and silicone gel-filled breast implants. These summaries provide information on the indications for use, risks, warnings, precautions, and studies associated with FDA approval of the device. Look at the frequency of serious complications found in the SSED. The most serious are “those that lead to further surgeries, such as ruptures or capsular contracture,” says Tajanay Ki, a biomedical engineer in CDRH.

FDA advises health care providers to give women the full labeling—all of the patient information from the manufacturer—for an implant. Ask your surgeon for the most recent version of the labeling. You should have at least 1-2 weeks to review the information before making a decision, but with some reconstruction or revision surgery cases, it may be advisable to perform surgery sooner.

3. Communicate with the surgeon.

Surgeons must evaluate the shape, size, surface texture and placement of the implant and the incision site for each woman. Ask the surgeon questions about his or her professional experience, the surgical procedure, and the ways the implant might affect an individual’s life.

Also, tell the surgeon about previous surgeries and your body’s response—for example, whether surgeries resulted in excessive scar tissue—and discuss your expectations. This helps the surgeon make operative decisions that achieve the desired appearance (i.e., incision location and size, implant size and placement).  Many women undergo reoperation to change implant size.  To achieve optimal results after the first procedure, careful planning and reasonable expectations are necessary.

4. Learn about long-term risks. 

Some women with breast implants have experienced connective tissue diseases, lactation difficulties or reproductive problems. However, current evidence does not support an association between breast implants and these conditions. FDA has identified a possible association between breast implants and the development of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a rare type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Women who have breast implants may have a very small but increased risk of developing ALCL in the fluid or scar tissue surrounding the implant. Like other lymphomas, ALCL is a cancer of the immune system and not of breast tissue.

5. Monitoring is crucial. 

FDA recommends that women with breast implants:

  • promptly report any unusual signs or symptoms to their health care providers, and
  • report any serious side effects to MedWatch, FDA’s safety information and adverse event reporting program.

Furthermore, women with silicone implants should get MRI screenings to detect silent ruptures three years after their surgery and every two years after that.  Insurance may not cover these screenings.

Burns recommends that women with breast implants continue to perform self-examinations and get mammograms to look for early signs of cancer. “Just because you have implants doesn’t mean you can ignore other breast health recommendations,” she says.

FDA’s Online Resources

FDA has a breast implants web page (www.fda.gov/breastimplants) with resources that include:

  • Links to patient information and data for each product.
  • Information about risks and complications
  • Questions to ask health care professionals regarding breast implant surgery
  • Contact information for manufacturers of FDA-approved breast implants and related professional organizations

This article appears on FDA’s Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

February 20, 2013

Enhanced by Zemanta
Share

Xmas toy safety tips from Seattle Children’s

Share

Toys that pose choking and other hazards to childrenDoctors’ toy safety tips for the holidays from Seattle Children’s On the Pulse blog

With an abundance of toys to choose from this holiday season, many parents may find themselves asking which toys are best for their young kids.

Pediatricians encourage parents – and anyone buying a gift for a baby or child – to think safety first.

Tony Woodward, MD, MBA, medical director of the division of emergency medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital, says parents should read toy labels, remove possible hazards, and expect the unexpected when it comes to kids and toys.

“Parents should remember that children don’t perceive toys the same way we do and often don’t use them as we might expect,” says Woodward. “If a toy can be misused, chewed on, eaten, swallowed or thrown at someone, it will be. Parents should ensure that if those things do happen, the child won’t be injured.”

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), there were more than 262,000 toy-related emergency room visits in the United States in 2011.

Woodward suggests parents keep these tips in mind when choosing toys for small kids:

Choking Hazards

Choking is the leading cause of toy-related deaths, according to the CPSC. In 2011, there were 13 reported toy-related deaths among children younger than 15 years in the United States, most from asphyxiation.

When choosing toys for small children, bigger is usually better:

  • Stay away from toys that contain many or small parts if there are small children in the household.
  • Be sure to read warning labels for age recommendations. Toys are age-graded to reflect safety risks, including choking hazards. A toy that may be appropriate for an older child can be potentially life-threatening for a baby or toddler.
  • Small balls are also particularly dangerous because they can block a child’s airway completely. “Water Balz,” for example, recalled earlier this week, absorb water and expand to 400 times their original size.

Woodward suggests this rule of thumb to help prevent choking: If a toy can fit inside a paper towel roll, the toy can obstruct the airway of a small child and prevent breathing.

Magnets

Toys that contain small magnets are especially dangerous for young kids. If swallowed, magnets can attract to one another in a child’s intestine and cause serious complications. Woodward says parents should look out for products like “Snake Eggs,” small magnets shaped like eggs that are marketed to children.

Button Batteries

Many toys and gadgets require button batteries, which can pose fatal risks for young kids. If a battery is swallowed, it can cause life-threatening injuries. Be sure batteries cannot be removed easily from toys.

Strangulation

Some toys have strings or cords that can become wrapped around a child’s neck and cause strangulation. Use caution with mobiles or pull toys with long string, and remove long ribbons from kids’ play areas.

Toys containing lead and other chemicals

Just like checking a food’s ingredient list, parents should read toy labels. Avoid products that contain PVC plastic, xylene, toluene, or dibutyl phthalate. Play cosmetics can be particularly hazardous.

Avoid toys and clothes that could contain lead paint or high levels of lead, such as vinyl lunch boxes or rain gear. To test products for lead, parents can purchase home testing kits, available at most local hardware shops. Buy paints, crayons and markers that say “non-toxic” on the label.

More toy safety tips

  • Include safety equipment with toys such as bikes, snowboards or skateboards. Helmets, elbow pads and knee pads make great stocking stuffers.
  • Avoid stuffed animals with buttons or removable parts.
  • Be cautious of toys that make loud noises. Toys that omit noise above 85 decibels can cause gradual hearing loss.
  • Consider the physical skills a child needs to play with a particular toy, and how well the child can understand how to use the toy.

Before wrapping presents this year, Woodward suggests parents review this checklist to help keep their kids safe: “Potential choking hazards should be removed, batteries and magnets should be inaccessible, toys that are sharp or can be used as weapons or projectiles should be removed and easily broken toys should be discarded.”

Toy safety resources:

Share
Trader Joes

Sunland expands recall of products linked to Salmonella outbreak.

Share

Sunland, Inc. of Portales, New Mexico has expanded its nationwide recall of its products linked to a Salmonella outbreak, adding its cashew butter, tahini and roasted blanched peanut products to the recall list, which already includes the company’s almond butter and peanut butter products.

The products are sold under a variety of brand names, including Trader Joe’s, Archer Farms, and Sprout’s.

The company has posted a list of the recalled products here: www.sunlandinc.com/788/html/pdfs/SunlandRecall.pdf

The outbreak was first linked to Trader Joe’s Valencia Creamy Salted Peanut Butter, a Sunland product, which Trader Joe’s pulled from its shelves last week.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 30 people in 19 states have been infected with the outbreak strain Salmonella Bredeney, including 2 in Washington state.

The number of ill persons identified in each state is as follows: Arizona (1), California (2), Connecticut (3), Illinois (1), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (3), Maryland (1), Michigan (1), Minnesota (1), Missouri (1), Nevada (1), New Jersey (2), New York (1), North Carolina (1), Pennsylvania (2), Rhode Island (1), Texas (4), Virginia (1), and Washington (2).

4 ill persons have been hospitalized, the CDC said, but no deaths have been reported.

The CDC recommends that “consumers do not eat recalled peanut butter and other products containing nuts and seeds and dispose of any remaining jars of product in the home or return the product to the place of purchase.”

“This is especially important for children under the age of 5 years, older adults, and people with weak immune systems,” the CDC said.

Sunland also advises consumers who have purchased the companies products subject to the recall should discard the product immediately.

Consumers can contact the company at 1-866-837- 1018, which is operational 24 hours a day, for information on the recall. In addition, a consumer services representative is available Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM MT at (575) 356-6638, the company said.

 

From the U.S. Food and Drug Administration:

What are the Symptoms of Salmonellosis?

Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.

However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized.

In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.

Who is at Risk?

Children are the most likely to get salmonellosis.

The rate of diagnosed infections in children less than five years old is higher than the rate in all other persons.

Young children, the elderly, and those with compromised immune systems are the most likely to have severe infections.

It is estimated that approximately 400 persons die each year with acute salmonellosis.

Who Should be Contacted?

Consumers who show any signs of illness from salmonellosis should consult their health care provider.

The FDA encourages consumers with questions about food safety to call 1-888-SAFEFOOD or consult the fda.gov website.

Additional resources:

Enhanced by Zemanta
Share