Category Archives: Infections

Food inspection grades: A – B – C , easy as 1 – 2 – 3 … or is it?

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EatBy hilarykaraszkc
Public Health Insider: Behind-the-scenes of the agency protecting the health and well-being of all people in Seattle & King County

New York City has them, so does L.A. Even Toronto has them. So why aren’t there food safety inspection grades posted outside of restaurants in King County?

The answer? Food safety performance placarding is coming, and when it does, it will give patrons and establishments alike information that is meaningful, clear, and motivating.

Diners need to know actual risk

There’s a lot on the line: Studies show that restaurant placards influence consumer behavior. But research on the systems that give A-B-C grades shows that A-B-C placards don’t communicate what consumers are expect. Continue reading

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Flu on the rise in King County

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Flu virusesFlu is here—and it’s a nasty one!

By Meredith Li-Vollmer
Public Health – Seattle & King County

Influenza is noticeably on the rise in King County, according the Public Health – Seattle & King County” sCommunicable Disease and Epidemiology unit.

Last week, the number of laboratory tests for flu rose sharply and a handful of schools, daycare programs, and long-term care facilities reported flu outbreaks.

A severe flu forecast

The flu season has only just begun, but the CDC is finding that so far, seasonal influenza A H3N2 viruses have been the most common flu viruses circulating. What’s the significance? In flu seasons in which H3N2 viruses predominate, there often are more severe flu illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths.

On top of that, roughly half of the H3N2 viruses that the CDC analyzed to date are drift variants: viruses with genetic changes that make them different from this season’s vaccine virus. This means the vaccine’s ability to protect against those viruses may be reduced.

So should you still get this year’s flu vaccine? Continue reading

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Illnesses due to raw milk on the rise

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From the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Photo by Maciej Lewandowski

Photo by Maciej Lewandowski

The average annual number of outbreaks due to drinking raw (unpasteurized) milk have more than quadrupled – from an average of three outbreaks per year during 1993-2006 to 13 per year during 2007-2012. Overall, there were 81 outbreaks in 26 states from 2007 to 2012.

As more states have allowed the legal sale of raw milk, there has been a rapid increase in the number of raw milk-associated outbreaks.The outbreaks, which accounted for about 5 percent of all food-borne outbreaks with a known food source, sickened nearly 1,000 people and sent 73 to the hospital. More than 80 percent of the outbreaks occurred in states where selling raw milk was legal.

As more states have allowed the legal sale of raw milk, there has been a rapid increase in the number of raw milk-associated outbreaks.

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US provides immunity to Ebola vaccine developers

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 Secretary of Health & Human Services Sylvia Mathews BurwellHealth and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell today announced a declaration under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act to facilitate the development and availability of experimental Ebola vaccines.

This declaration is intended to assist in the global community’s effort to help combat the current epidemic in West Africa and help prevent future outbreaks there, the HHS said.

The declaration provides immunity under United States law against legal claims related to the manufacturing, testing, development, distribution, and administration of three vaccines for Ebola virus disease. It does not, generally, provide immunity for a claim brought in a court outside the United States.

Past declarations have covered vaccines used in H5N1 pandemic influenza clinical trials in 2008, products related to the H1N1 influenza pandemic in 2009, and the development and manufacturing of antitoxins to treat botulism in 2008.

Here are more details about the action from the HHS release:

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King County man found not to have Ebola, released from hospital

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Map of SeattleThe King County resident who had been tested for Ebola has been found not does not have the virus, according to the results from the Washington State Public Health Laboratory, Public Health – Seattle and King County said Monday.

The man had developed a fever and a sore throat after traveling in the West African nation of Mali and had been admitted to UW Medicine’s Harborview Medical Center for evaluation. By late Sunday afternoon, his symptoms had improved and he was able to go home.

Following the CDC’s protocol for anyone arriving from Mali, his health will continue to be actively monitored by our Communicable Disease and Epidemiology staff until he has cleared the time frame in which Ebola could develop.

Learn more about Ebola: www.kingcounty.gov/health/Ebola

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Are vaccinations ‘Everybody’s Business’? – documentary and discussion

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A community conversation sponsored by the Northwest Biomedical Research Association

Are Vaccinations ‘Everybody’s Business?’

Discussion of the locally-made documentary, “Everybody’s Business,” by Laura Green, which examines the small, tight-knit community of Vashon Island that has become a reluctant poster child for the growing debate around childhood vaccinations. This portrait of an island community digs beneath the surface to investigate the tensions between individual choices and collective responsibilities.

Tuesday night’s conversation will be facilitated by Dr. Doug Opel, Seattle Children’s Research Institute.

WHEN:
Tuesday
December 9, 2014
From 5:45pm to 7:45pm

WHERE:
Macao Chocolate+Coffee
415 Westlake Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98109

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Video chat tops quarantine to combat TB

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TBBy Fred Mogul, WNYC

Thirty-four-year-old Karim works long days as an investment adviser, and when he doesn’t burn the midnight oil, he plays basketball or goes to the gym, hangs out with friends, or heads to coffee shops. You wouldn’t know he has an especially tough-to-treat illness.

“I have multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis,” he explains.

It’s called that, because at least two of the most potent drugs conventionally used to squelch the tuberculosis bacterium don’t work on the strain of the illness that Karim has. So he needs to take a combination of drugs, with harsher side effects, for 18 months. That’s two to three times longer than the traditional treatment for tuberculosis.

While Americans debate whether we should quarantine people who might have Ebola but clearly aren’t contagious, others wander among us who are infected with tuberculosis, which is.

“It has been a very stressful treatment process and a lot to deal with, but, thank God, it’s all going really, really well,” says Karim, who requested that NPR not use his full name out of concern he could be stigmatized for being a carrier of a disease that many people don’t understand.

While Americans debate whether we should quarantine people who might have Ebola but clearly aren’t contagious, others wander among us who are infected with tuberculosis — another disease that’s highly communicable in some forms. Close to 10,000 people in the United States have TB. Continue reading

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King County man tests negative for Ebola

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Map of SeattleA King County man who developed fever after returning to the area from Mali has tested negative for Ebola, Public Health – Seattle & King County health officials said Sunday.

The man who also had a sore throat — but none of the of symptoms typical of Ebola infection —  was admitted to UW Medicine’s Harborview Medical Center for evaluation.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends close monitoring of anyone with fever and other symptoms of Ebola who has recently travelled in Ebola-affected countries. Mali has had only 8 cases of the disease.

Here’s the announcement from Public Health – Seattle & King County:

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It’s not too late to vaccinate – Get your flu vaccine today!

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Flu shot todayFrom the US Centers for Disease Control 

After November when you see signs that advertise: “Get Your Flu Vaccine Here,” you might think, “Isn’t it too late for that?”

As long as flu viruses are spreading, it’s not too late to get a vaccine to protect yourself and your loved ones.

“Flu season typically peaks between December and February but significant activity can occur as late as May,” says Dr. Anne Schuchat, Director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases and Assistant Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service. “We are encouraging people who have not yet been vaccinated this season to get vaccinated now.”

For millions of people every season, the flu can mean a fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle aches, fatigue, and miserable days spent in bed. However, you may not realize that more than 200,000 people are hospitalized in the United States from flu complications each year.

The flu also can be deadly. Over a period of 30 years, between 1976 and 2006, estimates of yearly flu-associated deaths in the United States range from a low of about 3,000 to a high of about 49,000 people during the most severe season.
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This year’s flu season may be a bad one, says CDC

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influenza-virus-thumbnailEarly data suggests that the current 2014-2015 flu season could be severe, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) officials said Thursday, and they urged anyone who is still unvaccinated this season get vaccinated immediately.

People at high risk of complications who develop flu should receive prompt treatment with antiviral drugs, the agency said.

Here’s more from the CDC’s announcement:

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Tech’s Next Challenge In Global Health: Tools, Not Apps – Forbes

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Earth against the black void of spaceThis month, PATH produced a new tool for diagnosing river blindness, a disease that affects nearly 18 million globally (stats that are often unheard of).  It’s the first of its kind, says Nicole Fallat, Communications Officer at PATH.

via Tech’s Next Challenge In Global Health: Tools, Not Apps.

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Eight Washington hospitals identified for Ebola care

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ebolaAlthough all hospitals in the state are making plans to rapidly identify, isolate and safely evaluate people with suspected Ebola, eight hospitals are preparing to care for a person with Ebola for the duration of the illness.

These are:

  • CHI Franciscan Health (Harrison Medical Center – Bremerton campus),
  • MultiCare Tacoma General Hospital,
  • Providence Regional Medical Center Everett,
  • Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center and Children’s Hospital in Spokane,
  • Seattle Children’s Hospital,
  • Swedish Medical Center (Issaquah),
  • Virginia Mason Hospital, and
  • UW Medicine (Harborview Medical Center, UW Medical Center, Valley Medical Center)

“The chance of a confirmed case of Ebola in Washington is very low, but in the event it happens we want to be sure we have the capacity to provide ongoing care to a patient,” said Dr. Kathy Lofy, state Health Officer. “Patients with Ebola can become critically ill and require intensive care therapy. Care needs to be delivered using strict infection control practices. We are working with each of the committed hospitals to ensure we are coordinated and thorough in our response.” Continue reading

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Vaccination is the most effective flu prevention for seniors

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Flu shot todayBy Dr. Kory B. Fowler
Medical Director, Intermountain Region
Humana

The influenza virus– commonly known as the flu – affects up to 20 percent of Americans annually, leaving more than 200,000 people hospitalized from complications each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The flu is particularly dangerous for Washington seniors, who often have pre-existing chronic health conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease.

Last year the flu vaccine prevented 6.6 million illnesses, 3.2 million doctor visits and at least 79,000 hospitalizations.

There are many ways to reduce the risk of catching the virus, such as washing your hands often, but an annual flu shot is the most effective way to prevent the flu and reduce the risk of complications. Continue reading

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HIV clinic in Federal Way to increase treatment access for patients

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UW Federal WayFrom the Washington State Department of Health

The Department of Health is funding a new HIV satellite clinic in Federal Way.

It’s the fourth department-funded satellite clinic aimed at improving access to primary medical care for HIV-positive people in Puget Sound.

The satellite clinic operates through a partnership with Harborview Medical Center’s Madison Clinic.

A Harborview physician will be available every Thursday at the UW-Neighborhood Clinic in Federal Way to provide care to HIV patients living in Federal Way and nearby communities.

The department is giving Harborview $42,000 to cover the physician’s time and the costs of administering the services. The clinic opened Oct. 9, 2014.

Earlier satellite clinics opened in Everett, Bremerton and Olympia (in partnership with SeaMar Community Health Center).

The state health department estimates that there are as many as 2,365 people living with HIV in the southern King County and Pierce County areas. Continue reading

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