Category Archives: Hospital News

Seattle Children’s discovers lapse in sterilization at Bellevue clinic | Patients may need to be tested for Hep. B, C, HIV – Bellevue Reporter

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Seattle Children's Whale LogoSeattle Children’s Hospital is working with the state health department and the Centers for Disease Control after it was revealed that the required procedures for cleaning and sterilizing surgical instruments at the hospital’s Bellevue Clinic and Surgery Center were not always followed.

“I understand that families will be concerned, and rightly so, but from a scientific perspective, the risk is low, which I hope that families find reassuring,’ Seattle and King County Public Health official Justin Duchin, M.D. said at a press conference on August 26.

As a result of the problems with sterilization, patients who had a surgical procedure at the Bellevue Clinic may need to be tested for hepatitis B and C, as well as HIV, the hospital said in a statement.

Source: Seattle Children’s discovers lapse in sterilization at Bellevue clinic | Patients may need to be tested for Hep. B, C, HIV – Bellevue Reporter

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Is a double knee replacement right for you?

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Having both knees replaced at the same time has advantages

By Dr. David Kieras
Virginia Mason

samIf someone you know has severe arthritis in both knees that greatly reduces their quality of life, they may be a candidate for bilateral simultaneous knee replacement surgery, where both joints are simultaneously operated on in one surgical procedure.

Although not an option for everyone, this approach is enticing to many people who dread the idea of recovering from two separate surgeries, which delays recovery and a return to normal activities for several months, if not years.

Bilateral ‘staged’ knee replacement – one knee surgery followed by another – is not uncommon.  However, bilateral simultaneous knee replacement is more advanced and uncommon due to the special expertise and team coordination required.

It can be beneficial for people who have limited time off from work for rehabilitation and need to return to a more normal lifestyle as quickly as possible. Continue reading

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To survive, rural hospitals join forces

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By Michael Ollove
Stateline

WILLCOX, Arizona—Ask Sam Lindsey about the importance of Northern Cochise Community Hospital and he’ll give you a wry grin. You might as well be asking the 77-year-old city councilman to choose between playing pickup basketball—as he still does most Fridays—and being planted six feet under the Arizona dust.

Many of the country’s rural hospitals are struggling. Can “alliances” with other hospitals help them survive?

Lindsey believes he’s above ground, and still playing point guard down at the Mormon church, because of Northern Cochise. Last Christmas, he suffered a severe stroke in his home. He survived, he said, because his wife, Zenita, got him to the hospital within minutes. If it hadn’t been there, she would have had to drive him 85 miles to Tucson Medical Center. FOR RURAL HOSPITAL STORY

There are approximately 2,300 rural hospitals in the U.S., most of them concentrated in the Midwest and the South.

For a variety of reasons, many of them are struggling to survive. In the last five years, Congress has sharply reduced spending on Medicare, the federal health insurance program for the elderly, and the patients at rural hospitals tend to be older than those at urban or suburban ones.

Rural hospitals in sparsely populated areas see fewer patients but still have to maintain emergency rooms and beds for acute care. They serve many people who are uninsured and can’t afford to pay for the services they receive.  Continue reading

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For hospitals, sleep and patient satisfaction go hand in hand

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Insomnia Sleep Tacuinum SanitatisBy Shefali Luthra
KHN

It’s a common complaint — if you spend a night in the hospital, you probably won’t get much sleep.

There’s the noise. There’s the bright fluorescent hallway light. And there’s the unending barrage of nighttime interruptions: vitals checks, medication administration, blood draws and the rest.

As hospitals chase better patient ratings and health outcomes, an increasing number are rethinking how they function at night — so that more patients can sleep relatively uninterrupted.

Peter Ubel, a physician and a professor at Duke University’s business school, has studied the rational and irrational forces that affect health. But he was surprised when hospitalized at Duke in 2013 to get a small tumor removed at how difficult it was to sleep.

“There was no coordination,” he said. “One person would be in charge of measuring my blood pressure. Another would come in when the alarm went off, and they never thought, ‘Gee if the alarm goes off, I should also do blood pressure.’”

“From a patient perspective,” he added, “you’re sitting there going, ‘What the heck?’” Continue reading

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NYC hospitals to end filming patients without consent

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Photo by Brainloc

By Annie Waldman
ProPublica

Bruised by criticism after a reality TV show surreptitiously recorded and aired a man’s death, New York City hospitals will no longer allow patients to be filmed without getting prior consent.

The Greater New York Hospital Association, an umbrella organization that represents all of New York City’s hospitals, has asked its member institutions to put an end to filming patients for entertainment purposes without getting their permission.

The move came in response to an issue raised by a ProPublica story published with The New York Times earlier this year.

“Our member hospitals strongly agree that patients deserve privacy in the course of receiving care and that their medical information should be kept confidential in accordance with the law,” said Kenneth E. Raske, the president of Greater New York Hospital Association, in a letter to City Council members last month. The letter was released this week.

ProPublica’s report, published in January, revealed how ABC’s reality show “NY Med” filmed the death of Mark Chanko, a patient at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, without getting permission from him or his family. In July, New York City Council members demanded that city hospitals prohibit the filming of patients.

“Not everything is made for TV,” said New York councilmember Dan Garodnick in an interview. “When you go into a hospital, you deserve to know that your sensitive moments are not going to end up on primetime.”

Chanko’s family only found out about the filming after the episode featuring his death aired. The family was not even aware that camera crews had been in the emergency room during Chanko’s final moments.

[Photo by Brainloc]

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Half of US hospitals hit with a total of $420m in Medicare’s readmission penalties

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Sign for an emergency room.By Jordan Rau
KHN

Once again, the majority of the nation’s hospitals are being penalized by Medicare for having patients frequently return within a month of discharge — this time losing a combined $420 million, government records show.

In the fourth year of federal readmission penalties, 2,592 hospitals will receive lower payments for every Medicare patient that stays in the hospital — readmitted or not — starting in October.

Overall, Medicare’s punishments are slightly less severe than they were last year, both in the amount of the average fine and the number of hospitals penalized.

The Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, created by the Affordable Care Act, was designed to make hospitals pay closer attention to what happens to their patients after they get discharged.

Since the fines began, national readmission rates have dropped, but roughly one of every five Medicare patients sent to the hospital ends up returning within a month.

Some hospitals view the punishments as unfair because they can lose money even if they had fewer readmissions than they did in previous years. All but 209 of the hospitals penalized in this round were also punished last year, a Kaiser Health News analysis of the records found. Continue reading

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Yelp! adds medical quality data to its ratings

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yelp-logoStay far, far away’ and other things gleaned from Yelp health reviews

By Charles Ornstein ProPublica, Aug. 6, 2015, 5 a.m.
This story was co-published with NPR’s Shots blog.

Dental patients really don’t like Western Dental. Not its Anaheim, California clinic: “I hate this place!!!” one reviewer wrote on the rating site Yelp. Or one of its locations in Phoenix: “Learn from my terrible experience and stay far, far away.”

In fact, the chain of low-cost dental clinics, which has more Yelp reviews than any other health provider, has been repeatedly, often brutally, panned in some 3,000 online critiques 2014379 include the word “horrible.” Its average rating: 1.8 out of five stars.

Screen Shot 2015-08-06 at 9.47.38 AMPatients on Yelp aren’t fans of the ubiquitous lab testing company Quest Diagnostics either. The word “rude” appeared in 13 percent of its 2,500 reviews (average 2.7 stars). “It’s like the seventh level of hell,” one reviewer wrote of a Quest lab in Greenbrae, California.

Indeed, doctors and health professionals everywhere could learn a valuable lesson from the archives of Yelp: Your officious personality or brusque office staff can sink your reputation even if your professional skills are just fine.

“Rudest office staff ever. Also incompetent. I will settle for rude & competent or polite & incompetent. But both rude & incompetent is unacceptable,” wrote one Yelp reviewer of a New York internist.

ProPublica and Yelp recently agreed to a partnership, which will allow information from ProPublica’s interactive health databases to begin appearing on Yelp’s health provider pages.

In addition to reading about consumers’ experiences with hospitals, nursing homes and doctors, Yelp users will see objective data about how the providers’ practice patterns compare to their peers. Continue reading

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How much does it cost to have a baby? Hospital study finds huge price range

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pregnant-money-570By Michelle Andrews
KHN

Which hospital parents pick to deliver their baby can have serious cost consequences, according to a new study.

Hospital costs for women who had no maternal or obstetric risk factors to complicate childbirth ranged from less than $2,000 to nearly $12,000, the analysis of discharge data found. The wide variation in cost means that for expectant parents, it can pay to shop around. Continue reading

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Online scorecard helps you pick a surgeon

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surgeons performing surgery in operating roomThe independent investigative journalism website ProPublica has created online “Surgeon Scorecard” that you can use to find out a surgeon’s complication rate for eight commonly performed operations.

To learn about the complication rates of surgeons working at hospitals in Washington state go here.

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Many hospitals fail to follow guidelines for child abuse patients, study finds

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Fractured_ribs

Rib fractures in an infant secondary to child abuse – NIH photo

By Alana Pockros
KHN

About half of young children brought to hospitals with injuries indicating that they have been abused were not thoroughly evaluated for other injuries, and the use of proper care is less likely to happen in general hospitals than in those that specialize in pediatrics, a study released Monday found.

The researchers examined whether hospitals are adhering to guidelines from The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) that all children younger than 2 years old suspected of being victims of child abuse undergo skeletal surveys, a series of X-rays used to identify broken bones that are not readily apparent, called occult fractures.

The results, published in the journal Pediatrics, reveal a significant variation in hospitals’ evaluation of occult injuries, despite the AAP’s recommendations.

“In the young population, medical providers can miss important injuries. … Skeletal surveys can help identify them,” said Dr. Joanne Wood, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and senior author of the study. Continue reading

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Skin cancer: 9 things to know to lower your risk

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Blue sky and white clouds (Panorama)

The how-to’s of skin cancer prevention haven’t changed much in recent years — avoid too much ultraviolet light via sun or tanning beds and take care not to burn or tan — but that message is clearly not reaching enough people, according to Fred Hutch researchers.

  

With climbing rates of skin cancer in the U.S., including the deadly form, melanoma, it’s time to get serious about prevention, experts say.

The how-to’s haven’t changed much in recent years — avoid too much ultraviolet light via sun or tanning beds and take care not to burn or tan — but that message is clearly not reaching enough people, said Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center cancer prevention researcher Dr. Margaret Madeleine.

A recent study by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that nearly 5 million U.S. adults are treated every year for all types of skin cancer to the tune of $8.1 billion. Melanoma rates have doubled in this country since 1982, according to a CDC report earlier this month. The majority of these cancer cases are preventable.

Last summer, the U.S. Surgeon General issued a call to action to prevent this too-common disease: Non-melanoma skin cancers, chiefly basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are the most common cancers in this country by far, afflicting an estimated 4.3 million people per year.

That report, the first time the surgeon general had come out against sunbathing and tanning beds, is a great step, Madeleine said. But we need to do more.

“The message needs to be louder,” Madeleine said. “There are some really serious public health tactics that could be used.”

For example, tanning beds don’t carry as high a tax rate as cigarettes do, Madeleine said. We could also be teaching kids about skin cancer prevention in schools and doing more to combat the pervasive idea among teenagers and young adults that indoor tanning is harmless.

Nine things to know to reduce your skin cancer risk right now

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Cancer quackery fuels concern among doctors, FDA

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Photo Credit:  Bo Jungmayer / Fred Hutch News Service

Be wary of possible side effects, drug interactions when using alternative health supplements, physicians caution

By By Bill Briggs
Fred Hutch News Service

One potentially fake cancer drug sold online can actually cause malignancies. One enema machine, purported to treat ovarian cancer under the FDA banner, was never cleared for sale in the U.S., federal health officials assert.

Those products and more were targeted last week in a global crackdown on more than 1,000 websites that sell possibly dangerous and bogus medicines and medical devices. The bust, conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Interpol, coincides with the surge of unproven cancer “cures” hawked by Internet sellers, the FDA warns.

For curious consumers, the FDA posts a running list of “fake cancer cures” that currently spans 187 oils, drinks, plants and animals parts sold by web merchants from North Carolina to Oregon.

Cancer-treatment fraud is “particularly heartless,” FDA officials say, because it preys on the desperation of patients who are tempted “to jump at anything that appears to offer a chance for a cure.” At Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, some doctors are equally leery when patients ask to add claimed “natural” remedies to their treatment regimens.

“We’re quite clear: No over-the-counter herbal treatments – the things people get that are supposed to help their immune system, [or] whatever scams that people come across,” said Dr. George Georges, a hematopoietic cell transplant doctor at Fred Hutch. Continue reading

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US to pay for Agent Orange claims – AP

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veteran-affairs-seal-vaEnding years of wait, the government agreed Thursday to provide millions of dollars in disability benefits to as many as 2,100 Air Force reservists and active-duty forces exposed to Agent Orange residue on airplanes used in the Vietnam War.

The expected cost over 10 years is $47.5 million, with separate health care coverage adding to the price tag.

Source: News from The Associated Press

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Some hospitals charge patients 10x what they charge Medicare

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Study: Highest-Charging U.S. Hospitals Are For-Profits, Concentrated In Florida

By Jenny Gold/KHN

Twenty-dollar bill in a pill bottleTalk about sticker shock: Some U.S. hospitals charge patients more than 10 times the rates paid by Medicare.

Of the 50 U.S. hospitals with the highest charges, 49 are for-profit institutions, 20 operate in Florida, and half are owned by a single chain, according to a study published in the journal Health Affairs Monday.

That doesn’t mean all or even most patients end up paying those charges. Private insurers are able to negotiate the sticker price down significantly. Patients paying out of pocket can often negotiate discounts or get charity care if they are low-income.

The average U.S. hospital charges a somewhat less staggering sum: 3.4 times the rates paid by Medicare.

The average U.S. hospital charges a somewhat less staggering sum: 3.4 times the rates paid by Medicare, the federal health care plan for the elderly and disabled which pays fixed rates for procedures.

But for uninsured patients asked to pay full charges, insured patients who end up at an out-of-network hospital and patients whose treatment is covered by casualty or workers compensation insurance, these charges can matter a lot.

“Hopefully this is a wake-up call for people to recognize there’s a problem,” said Gerard Anderson, a professor of health policy at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and one of the authors of the study, which analyzed 2012 Medicare cost reports. Continue reading

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