Category Archives: Hospital News

Hospitals leave downtown for more prosperous digs

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A sign marks the location of a proposed new St. Elizabeth’s hospital in O’Fallon, Mo., on 114 acres of farmland just off Interstate 64. (Photo by Phil Galewitz/KHN)

By Phil Galewitz
KHN

BELLEVILLE, Ill. – Nearly as old as the railroad that slices through this southern Illinois city just east of the Mississippi River, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital has been a downtown bedrock since 1875.

Started by three nuns from a Franciscan order in Germany, the Catholic hospital still seeks “to embody Christ’s healing love” to the sick, the aged and the poor, according to its mission statement.

It is so tied to the city that when the local economy slumped in 2009, the nonprofit St. Elizabeth’s gave $20 to every employee to spend on Main Street, sending hundreds of shoppers out to the mostly mom- and pop-owned stores.

But St. E’s, as locals call it, now faces its own financial troubles, largely a result of the costs of maintaining an obsolete facility and of treating more low-income and uninsured patients from Belleville and neighboring East St. Louis, one of the poorest cities in the Midwest.

After a decade of losing money, St. Elizabeth’s officials are taking a radical step: Like a small but growing number of hospitals around the country, they plan to close the 303-bed hospital and move elsewhere.

They are seeking state approval to build a $300-million facility seven miles northeast, in O’Fallon, a wealthier city that is one of the fastest-growing communities in the St. Louis region with new subdivisions, proximity to a regional mall and quick access to Interstate 64.

Describing plans to leave behind some services, including a walk-in clinic, St. Elizabeth’s CEO Maryann Reese insists the hospital is not abandoning the city or the poor. Continue reading

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The Salty Truth: Many Popular Foods With Unhealthy Amounts of Salt – ABC News

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pizzaYou may be consuming more salt than you need — and the salt shaker is probably not to blame.

When researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sought to shake out how much sodium — a major component of table salt — was in various food items nationwide, they found that the biggest high sodium offenders were pizzas, pastas and meats, nearly 75 percent of which exceeded national sodium thresholds. Additionally, more than half of cold cuts, soups and sandwiches contained more than a healthy amount of sodium.

via The Salty Truth: Many Popular Foods With Unhealthy Amounts of Salt – ABC News.

 

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In pursuit of patient satisfaction, hospitals update the hated hospital gown

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By Shefali Luthra
KHN

Whether a patient is in the hospital for an organ transplant, an appendectomy or to have a baby, one complaint is common: the gown.

You know the one. It might as well have been stitched together with paper towels and duct tape, and it usually leaves the wearer’s behind hanging out.

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“You’re at the hospital because something’s wrong with you –  you’re vulnerable – then you get to wear the most vulnerable garment ever invented to make the whole experience that much worse,” said Ted Streuli, who lives in Edmond, Okla., and has had to wear hospital gowns on multiple occasions.

“They are horrible. They are demeaning. They are belittling.”

 Put another way: “They are horrible. They are demeaning. They are belittling. They are disempowering,” said Camilla McRory of Olney, Md.

Hospital gowns have gotten a face-lift after some help from fashion designers like these from Patient Style and the Henry Ford Innovation Institute.

The gowns are among the most vexing parts of being in the hospital. But if efforts by some health systems are an indicator, the design may be on its way out of style. Continue reading

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VA distance requirement will no longer be “as the crow flies”

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A black crowWashington – In order to expand eligibility for the Veterans Choice Program, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced that it will change the calculation used to determine the distance between a Veteran’s residence and the nearest VA medical facility from a straight line distance to driving distance.

The policy change will be made through regulatory action in the coming weeks.

The method of determining driving distance will be through distance as calculated by using a commercial product. The change is expected to roughly double the number of eligible Veterans.

Continue reading

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VA makes it easier for you to get your benefits

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See the changes to VA benefits
Its now faster, easier and more efficient to file claims
See the changes to VA benefits

Today, claims become faster, easier and more accurate

Starting today, March 25th, VA is streamlining claims processes; to deliver benefits faster and more accurately.

See the changes to VA benefits

Three important changes are now in affect.

Informal claims have migrated to a new intent to fileprocess.

Use of standardized forms is now required when filing for benefits.

Initiating an appeal requires a standardized notice of disagreement form.

To learn how the new standardized forms and intent to fileprocess affects you:

See the changes to VA benefits
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New, easier, online way to apply for VA benefits

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Online Tools, Standardized Forms, and More

veteran-affairs-seal-vaEffective March 24th, 2015, VA is implementing improvements to make it easier for you to apply for benefits.

Online application tools, standardized forms, and a new intent to file process will create faster and more accurate decisions on your claims and appeals.

As part of the VA’s full-scale transformation in 2015, these new changes will:

  • Streamline the benefits process, making it faster and easier
  • Use standardized forms to file disability claims and compensation appeals
  • Establish a new intent to file a claim process

See how the changes affect you:

See the changes to VA benefits
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VA eliminates net worth as health-care eligibility factor

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Instead of combining the sum of Veterans’ income with their assets to determine eligibility for medical care and copayment obligations, VA will now only consider a Veteran’s gross household income and deductible expenses from the previous year.

From the Department of Veterans Affairs

veteran-affairs-seal-vaWashington – The Department of Veterans Affairs is updating the way it determines eligibility for VA health care, a change that will result in more Veterans having access to the health care benefits they’ve earned and deserve.

Effective 2015, VA has eliminated the use of net worth as a determining factor for both health care programs and copayment responsibilities.

This change makes VA health care benefits more accessible to lower-income Veterans and brings VA policies in line with Secretary Robert A. McDonald’s MyVA initiative which reorients VA around Veterans’ needs.

“Everything that we do and every decision we make has to be focused on the Veterans we serve,” said VA Secretary Robert A. McDonald. “We are working every day to earn their trust. Changing the way we determine eligibility to make the process easier for Veterans is part of our promise to our Veterans.”

Instead of combining the sum of Veterans’ income with their assets to determine eligibility for medical care and copayment obligations, VA will now only consider a Veteran’s gross household income and deductible expenses from the previous year. Continue reading

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Rural hospitals, one of the cornerstones of small town life, face increasing pressure

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Farm with red barnBy Guy Gugliotta
KHN

MOUNT VERNON, Texas — Despite residents’ concerns and a continuing need for services, the 25-bed hospital that served this small East Texas town for more than 25 years closed its doors at the end of 2014, joining the ranks of dozens of other small rural hospitals that have been unable to weather the punishment of a changing national health care environment.

For the high percentages of elderly and uninsured patients who live in rural areas, closures mean longer trips for treatment and uncertainty during times of crisis. “I came to the emergency room when I had panic attacks,” said George Taylor, 60, a retired federal government employee. “It was very soothing and the staff was great. I can’t imagine Mount Vernon without a hospital.”

Since 2010, 48 rural hospitals have closed, the majority in Southern states, and 283 are in trouble.

The Kansas-based National Rural Health Association, which represents around 2,000 small hospitals throughout the country and other rural care providers, says that 48 rural hospitals have closed since 2010, the majority in Southern states, and 283 others are in trouble. In Texas along, 10 have changed. 

“If there was one particular policy causing the trouble, it would be easy to understand,” said health economist Mark Holmes, from the University of North Carolina, whose rural health research program studies national trends in rural health care. “But there are a lot of things going on.” Continue reading

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Hospitals struggle to improve patient satisfaction

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hospital magnify 300By Jordan Rau
KHN

SALISBURY, N.C. — Lillie Robinson came to Rowan Medical Center for surgery on her left foot. She expected to be in and out in a day, returning weeks later for her surgeon to operate on the other foot.

But that’s not how things turned out. “When I got here I found out he was doing both,” she said. “We didn’t realize that until they started medicating me for the procedure.” Robinson signed a consent form and the operation went fine, but she was told she would be in the hospital far longer than she had expected.

“I wasn’t prepared for that,” she said.

Disappointing patients such as Robinson is a persistent problem for Rowan, a hospital with some the lowest levels of patient satisfaction in the country. In surveys sent to patients after they leave, Rowan’s patients are less likely than those at most hospitals to say that they always received help promptly and that their pain was controlled well. Rowan’s patients say they would recommend the hospital far less often than patients do elsewhere.

In April, the government will begin boiling down the patient feedback into a five-star rating for hospitals. Hospitals say judging them on a one-to-five scale is too simplistic.

Feedback from patients such as Robinson matters to Rowan and to hospitals across the country. Since Medicare began requiring hospitals to collect information about patient satisfaction and report it to the government in 2007, these patient surveys have grown in influence.  For the past three years, the federal government has considered survey results when setting pay levels for hospitals. Some private insurers do as well.

In April, the government will begin boiling down the patient feedback into a five-star rating for hospitals. Federal officials say they hope that will make it easier for consumers to digest the information now available on Medicare’s Hospital Compare website. Hospitals say judging them on a one-to-five scale is too simplistic.

Some Hospitals Improve As Others Stagnate 

Nationally, the hospital industry has improved in all the areas the surveys track, including clean and quiet their rooms are and how well doctors and nurses communicate.But hundreds of hospitals have not made headway in boosting their ratings, federal records show. Continue reading

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UW medical school to be ranked in the top 10 for research and primary care by US News & World Report

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UW US News & World Report is offering a “sneak peek” at its 2016 Best Graduate School Rankings due out next week. University of Washington will be ranked in the top 10 in the nation for research and for primary care.

via 2016 Best Graduate Schools Preview: Top 10 Medical Schools – US News.

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Widow sues Virginia Mason; hospital begins notifying ‘superbug’ victims | The Seattle Times

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creTheresa Bigler, of Woodway, is suing Virginia Mason Medical Center and a medical-device manufacturer after the death of her husband following a “superbug” infection. Hospital officials have reversed course to reach out to affected patients and families.

via Widow sues Virginia Mason; hospital begins notifying ‘superbug’ victims | The Seattle Times.

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Patient safety advocate to pay $1 million to settle kickback allegations

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20150302-patient-safety-300x200By Marshall Allen
ProPublica

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday.

Denham, a patient safety consultant from Laguna Beach, Calif., had allegedly solicited and accepted monthly payments from CareFusion Corp., maker of the antiseptic ChloraPrep, while serving as co-chairman of a National Quality Forum committee in 2009 and 2010.

The nonprofit quality forum in Washington, D.C., reviews evidence and makes recommendations on best practices that are considered the gold-standard by health care providers nationwide.

ProPublica previously reported that Denham hadn’t disclosed the payments to the panel of experts he was leading for the forum, and that other members of the Safe Practices Committee had not intended to endorse ChloraPrep. But Denham had advocated for the drug during the group’s meetings.

The committee’s final report recommended the product’s formulation to prevent infections, ProPublica found.

“Kickback schemes undermine the integrity of medical decisions, subvert the health marketplace and waste taxpayer dollars,” said Benjamin C. Mizer, acting assistant attorney for the Justice Department’s civil division, in a news release announcing the settlement.

PHOTO: SafetyLeaders/Flickr

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Rush University Adds Patient Scores to Doctor Profiles — Doctors Lounge

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Patient feedback goes on doctors’ profile pages

C plus gradeRush University Medical Center’s website has started adding the results of patient surveys to individual physician profiles, according to a report published by the medical center.

Feedback is gathered each year using data from approximately 17,000 patients who receive mail or e-mail surveys after appointments. Patients are asked for feedback about care and service in more than 30 questions, including 10 that focus on their care providers.

Patient feedback will be made available for any provider for whom the medical center has received 30 or more surveys in a one-year period.

via Rush University Adds Patient Scores to Doctor Profiles –Doctors Lounge.

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Attention, shoppers: Prices for 70 health care procedures now online!

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By Jay Hancock
KNH

Buying health care in America is like shopping blindfolded at Macy’s and getting the bill months after you leave the store, economist Uwe Reinhardt likes to say.

A tool that went online Wednesday is supposed to give patients a small peek at the products and prices before they open their wallets.

Got a sore knee? Having a baby? Need a primary-care doctor? Shopping for an MRI scan?

Guroo.com shows the average local cost for 70 common diagnoses and medical tests in most states. That’s the real cost — not “charges” that often get marked down — based on a giant database of what insurance companies actually pay.

OK, this isn’t like Priceline.com for knee replacements. What Guroo hopes to do for consumers is limited so far.

Guroo.com Demo from Health Care Cost Institute on Vimeo.

It won’t reflect costs for particular hospitals or doctors, although officials say that’s coming for some. And it doesn’t have much to say initially about the quality of care.

Still, Guroo should shed new light on the country’s opaque, complex and maddening medical bazaar, say consumer advocates.

“This has the potential to be a game-changer,” said Katherine Hempstead, who analyzes health insurance for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “It’s good for uninsured people. It’s good for people with high deductibles. It’s good for any person that’s kind of wondering: If I go to see the doctor for such-and-such, what might happen next?” Continue reading

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How much does it cost?

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A new website, www.guroo.com, allows you to find out how much care for common conditions will cost. The site provides local, state and national average charges for these conditions. The site was created by the Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI), an independent, non-partisan, non-profit organization that promotes research and analysis on the causes of rising US health spending.

Guroo.com Demo from Health Care Cost Institute on Vimeo.

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