Category Archives: Hospital News

How much does it cost to have a baby? Hospital study finds huge price range

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pregnant-money-570By Michelle Andrews
KHN

Which hospital parents pick to deliver their baby can have serious cost consequences, according to a new study.

Hospital costs for women who had no maternal or obstetric risk factors to complicate childbirth ranged from less than $2,000 to nearly $12,000, the analysis of discharge data found. The wide variation in cost means that for expectant parents, it can pay to shop around. Continue reading

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Online scorecard helps you pick a surgeon

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surgeons performing surgery in operating roomThe independent investigative journalism website ProPublica has created online “Surgeon Scorecard” that you can use to find out a surgeon’s complication rate for eight commonly performed operations.

To learn about the complication rates of surgeons working at hospitals in Washington state go here.

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Many hospitals fail to follow guidelines for child abuse patients, study finds

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Rib fractures in an infant secondary to child abuse – NIH photo

By Alana Pockros
KHN

About half of young children brought to hospitals with injuries indicating that they have been abused were not thoroughly evaluated for other injuries, and the use of proper care is less likely to happen in general hospitals than in those that specialize in pediatrics, a study released Monday found.

The researchers examined whether hospitals are adhering to guidelines from The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) that all children younger than 2 years old suspected of being victims of child abuse undergo skeletal surveys, a series of X-rays used to identify broken bones that are not readily apparent, called occult fractures.

The results, published in the journal Pediatrics, reveal a significant variation in hospitals’ evaluation of occult injuries, despite the AAP’s recommendations.

“In the young population, medical providers can miss important injuries. … Skeletal surveys can help identify them,” said Dr. Joanne Wood, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and senior author of the study. Continue reading

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Skin cancer: 9 things to know to lower your risk

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Blue sky and white clouds (Panorama)

The how-to’s of skin cancer prevention haven’t changed much in recent years — avoid too much ultraviolet light via sun or tanning beds and take care not to burn or tan — but that message is clearly not reaching enough people, according to Fred Hutch researchers.

  

With climbing rates of skin cancer in the U.S., including the deadly form, melanoma, it’s time to get serious about prevention, experts say.

The how-to’s haven’t changed much in recent years — avoid too much ultraviolet light via sun or tanning beds and take care not to burn or tan — but that message is clearly not reaching enough people, said Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center cancer prevention researcher Dr. Margaret Madeleine.

A recent study by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that nearly 5 million U.S. adults are treated every year for all types of skin cancer to the tune of $8.1 billion. Melanoma rates have doubled in this country since 1982, according to a CDC report earlier this month. The majority of these cancer cases are preventable.

Last summer, the U.S. Surgeon General issued a call to action to prevent this too-common disease: Non-melanoma skin cancers, chiefly basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are the most common cancers in this country by far, afflicting an estimated 4.3 million people per year.

That report, the first time the surgeon general had come out against sunbathing and tanning beds, is a great step, Madeleine said. But we need to do more.

“The message needs to be louder,” Madeleine said. “There are some really serious public health tactics that could be used.”

For example, tanning beds don’t carry as high a tax rate as cigarettes do, Madeleine said. We could also be teaching kids about skin cancer prevention in schools and doing more to combat the pervasive idea among teenagers and young adults that indoor tanning is harmless.

Nine things to know to reduce your skin cancer risk right now

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Cancer quackery fuels concern among doctors, FDA

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Photo Credit:  Bo Jungmayer / Fred Hutch News Service

Be wary of possible side effects, drug interactions when using alternative health supplements, physicians caution

By By Bill Briggs
Fred Hutch News Service

One potentially fake cancer drug sold online can actually cause malignancies. One enema machine, purported to treat ovarian cancer under the FDA banner, was never cleared for sale in the U.S., federal health officials assert.

Those products and more were targeted last week in a global crackdown on more than 1,000 websites that sell possibly dangerous and bogus medicines and medical devices. The bust, conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Interpol, coincides with the surge of unproven cancer “cures” hawked by Internet sellers, the FDA warns.

For curious consumers, the FDA posts a running list of “fake cancer cures” that currently spans 187 oils, drinks, plants and animals parts sold by web merchants from North Carolina to Oregon.

Cancer-treatment fraud is “particularly heartless,” FDA officials say, because it preys on the desperation of patients who are tempted “to jump at anything that appears to offer a chance for a cure.” At Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, some doctors are equally leery when patients ask to add claimed “natural” remedies to their treatment regimens.

“We’re quite clear: No over-the-counter herbal treatments – the things people get that are supposed to help their immune system, [or] whatever scams that people come across,” said Dr. George Georges, a hematopoietic cell transplant doctor at Fred Hutch. Continue reading

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US to pay for Agent Orange claims – AP

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veteran-affairs-seal-vaEnding years of wait, the government agreed Thursday to provide millions of dollars in disability benefits to as many as 2,100 Air Force reservists and active-duty forces exposed to Agent Orange residue on airplanes used in the Vietnam War.

The expected cost over 10 years is $47.5 million, with separate health care coverage adding to the price tag.

Source: News from The Associated Press

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Some hospitals charge patients 10x what they charge Medicare

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Study: Highest-Charging U.S. Hospitals Are For-Profits, Concentrated In Florida

By Jenny Gold/KHN

Twenty-dollar bill in a pill bottleTalk about sticker shock: Some U.S. hospitals charge patients more than 10 times the rates paid by Medicare.

Of the 50 U.S. hospitals with the highest charges, 49 are for-profit institutions, 20 operate in Florida, and half are owned by a single chain, according to a study published in the journal Health Affairs Monday.

That doesn’t mean all or even most patients end up paying those charges. Private insurers are able to negotiate the sticker price down significantly. Patients paying out of pocket can often negotiate discounts or get charity care if they are low-income.

The average U.S. hospital charges a somewhat less staggering sum: 3.4 times the rates paid by Medicare.

The average U.S. hospital charges a somewhat less staggering sum: 3.4 times the rates paid by Medicare, the federal health care plan for the elderly and disabled which pays fixed rates for procedures.

But for uninsured patients asked to pay full charges, insured patients who end up at an out-of-network hospital and patients whose treatment is covered by casualty or workers compensation insurance, these charges can matter a lot.

“Hopefully this is a wake-up call for people to recognize there’s a problem,” said Gerard Anderson, a professor of health policy at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and one of the authors of the study, which analyzed 2012 Medicare cost reports. Continue reading

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Federal funds for charity care at risk in states that refuse to expand Medicaid

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Flag-map_of_Florida.svgBy Christine Vestal
KHN

The federal government is quietly warning states that failure to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act could imperil billions in federal subsidies for hospitals and doctors who care for the poor.

In an April 14 letter to Florida Medicaid director Justin Senior, Vikki Wachino, acting director of the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) wrote: “Uncompensated care pool funding should not pay for costs that would be covered in a Medicaid expansion.”

Federal money to support low-income clinics and hospitals is slated to decline under the Affordable Care Act as more people become insured.

Medicaid is the joint federal-state government health insurance program for the poor. Under the Affordable Care Act, states can choose to expand coverage to more people, with the federal government paying the entire costs of expansion through next year.

Florida has asked CMS to renew $1.3 billion in federal funding for its 2016 “low-income pool,” even though the state has rejected Medicaid expansion.

CMS maintains that any extension must take into account the more than 800,000 residents whose medical bills would be covered by Medicaid were the state to expand the program.

Photo courtesy of Darwinek via Wikimedia Commons CC Continue reading

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Losing a hospital in the heart of a small city

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By Sarah Jane Tribble, WCPN

In a leafy suburb of Cleveland, 108-year-old Lakewood Hospital is expected to close in the next two years.

Mike Summers points to the fourth floor windows on the far left side of the historic brick building. He recalls spending three weeks in one of those rooms. It was Christmas 1965 and Summers had a broken hip.

“I remember hearing Christmas bells from the church across the street,” he says.

Lakewood Hospital, which opened its doors in 1907, is slated to close. Across the country, small hospitals are closing and redirecting residents to newer hospitals as patient populations shift with changing economies. (Photo by Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN)

Lakewood Hospital, which opened its doors in 1907, is slated to close. Across the country, small hospitals are closing and redirecting residents to newer hospitals as patient populations shift with changing economies. (Photo by Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN)

Summers was born at this hospital. His sister was born here. This hospital has a special place in his heart. But then he became mayor of Lakewood four years ago and realized the hospital was a financial liability for the small city, which has seen a sharp increase in poverty levels in the past two decades.

The hospital, operated for the city by the large nonprofit Cleveland Clinic system, has lost money since 2005. Executives say they need to close it and replace it with a smaller outpatient health center and emergency room.

“I’ve grown to understand the situation we are in is not unique. There are considerable forces at play and we are in the middle of all of them and a lot of communities are just like us,” Summers says.

Lakewood Hospital is this community’s biggest employer, with 1,000 workers. It has been a rich source of municipal revenues even as manufacturing jobs left the region.

But the hospital, operated for the city by the large nonprofit Cleveland Clinic system, has lost money since 2005. Executives say they need to close it and replace it with a smaller outpatient health center and emergency room.
Continue reading

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Patients Not Hurt When Their Hospitals Close, Study Finds

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By Jordan Rau
KHN

A hospital closure can send tremors through a city or town, leaving residents fearful about how they will be cared for in emergencies and serious illnesses. A study released Monday offers some comfort, finding that when hospitals shut down, death rates and other markers of quality generally do not worsen.

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Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health examined 195 hospital closures between 2003 and 2011, looking at health experiences in the year before and the year after the hospital went out of business.

Their paper, published in the journal Health Affairs, found that changes in death rates of people on Medicare — both those who had been in the hospital and among the broader populace — were no different than those for people in similar places where no hospital had closed.

While the researchers noted that some people might be inconvenienced by having to travel further for care, they found no significant changes in how often Medicare beneficiaries were admitted to hospitals, how long they stayed or how much their care cost.

The closed hospitals tended to be financially troubled, with revenues averaging 13 percent less than the cost of running the institutions.

“It’s possible that we didn’t see any change in outcomes because patients instead went to nearby hospitals that had better finances and may have had more resources to provide care,” said Dr. Karen Joynt, the lead researcher on the study.

She cautioned that the study looked at the average experience of a hospital closure and should not be interpreted to mean that every hospital loss is harmless. “I would be shocked if you couldn’t find an example where access is really threatened,” she said. Continue reading

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Hospitals turn to patients for advice

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H for hospitalBy Shefali Luthra
KHN

The system, which is now being phased in, will help coordinate services and reshape how patients and doctors find and read medical information.

The fact that Partners sought the perspective of patients highlights how hospitals increasingly care about what their customers think.

“It’s such a great experience,” Maier said. “They treat us as a member – a partner – in their review process.”

Jane Maier was one of a select group of patients invited in early 2012 to help Partners HealthCare, Massachusetts’ largest health system, pick its new electronic health record system – a critical investment of close to $700 million.

Jane Maier was one of a select group of patients invited in early 2012 to help Partners HealthCare, Massachusetts’ largest health system, pick its new electronic health record system – a critical investment of close to $700 million.

Patient advisory councils, like the one Maier belongs to, often serve as sounding boards for hospital leaders – offering advice on a range of issues.

Members are usually patients and relatives who had bad hospital experiences and want to change how things work, or who liked their stay and want to remain involved.

For Maier, it all started in 2009 when she had surgery at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital, a Partners facility.

Her husband wrote to the hospital’s CEO, praising her experience.

The couple was then invited to speak at a hospital leadership retreat, sharing with top executives both the good and the not-so-good, and Maier was recruited to serve on a new patient advisory panel.

This hunt for patient perspective, which is becoming more and more common, is fueled in part by the health law’s quality-improvement provisions and other federal financial incentives, such as the link between Medicare payments and patient satisfaction scores. Continue reading

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Hospitals leave downtown for more prosperous digs

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hospital-sign-ofallon

A sign marks the location of a proposed new St. Elizabeth’s hospital in O’Fallon, Mo., on 114 acres of farmland just off Interstate 64. (Photo by Phil Galewitz/KHN)

By Phil Galewitz
KHN

BELLEVILLE, Ill. – Nearly as old as the railroad that slices through this southern Illinois city just east of the Mississippi River, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital has been a downtown bedrock since 1875.

Started by three nuns from a Franciscan order in Germany, the Catholic hospital still seeks “to embody Christ’s healing love” to the sick, the aged and the poor, according to its mission statement.

It is so tied to the city that when the local economy slumped in 2009, the nonprofit St. Elizabeth’s gave $20 to every employee to spend on Main Street, sending hundreds of shoppers out to the mostly mom- and pop-owned stores.

But St. E’s, as locals call it, now faces its own financial troubles, largely a result of the costs of maintaining an obsolete facility and of treating more low-income and uninsured patients from Belleville and neighboring East St. Louis, one of the poorest cities in the Midwest.

After a decade of losing money, St. Elizabeth’s officials are taking a radical step: Like a small but growing number of hospitals around the country, they plan to close the 303-bed hospital and move elsewhere.

They are seeking state approval to build a $300-million facility seven miles northeast, in O’Fallon, a wealthier city that is one of the fastest-growing communities in the St. Louis region with new subdivisions, proximity to a regional mall and quick access to Interstate 64.

Describing plans to leave behind some services, including a walk-in clinic, St. Elizabeth’s CEO Maryann Reese insists the hospital is not abandoning the city or the poor. Continue reading

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The Salty Truth: Many Popular Foods With Unhealthy Amounts of Salt – ABC News

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pizzaYou may be consuming more salt than you need — and the salt shaker is probably not to blame.

When researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sought to shake out how much sodium — a major component of table salt — was in various food items nationwide, they found that the biggest high sodium offenders were pizzas, pastas and meats, nearly 75 percent of which exceeded national sodium thresholds. Additionally, more than half of cold cuts, soups and sandwiches contained more than a healthy amount of sodium.

via The Salty Truth: Many Popular Foods With Unhealthy Amounts of Salt – ABC News.

 

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In pursuit of patient satisfaction, hospitals update the hated hospital gown

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By Shefali Luthra
KHN

Whether a patient is in the hospital for an organ transplant, an appendectomy or to have a baby, one complaint is common: the gown.

You know the one. It might as well have been stitched together with paper towels and duct tape, and it usually leaves the wearer’s behind hanging out.

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“You’re at the hospital because something’s wrong with you –  you’re vulnerable – then you get to wear the most vulnerable garment ever invented to make the whole experience that much worse,” said Ted Streuli, who lives in Edmond, Okla., and has had to wear hospital gowns on multiple occasions.

“They are horrible. They are demeaning. They are belittling.”

 Put another way: “They are horrible. They are demeaning. They are belittling. They are disempowering,” said Camilla McRory of Olney, Md.

Hospital gowns have gotten a face-lift after some help from fashion designers like these from Patient Style and the Henry Ford Innovation Institute.

The gowns are among the most vexing parts of being in the hospital. But if efforts by some health systems are an indicator, the design may be on its way out of style. Continue reading

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