Category Archives: Diabetes

Only half of US adults being screened for diabetes

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GlucometerBy Sharyn Alden
Health Behavior News Service

A study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that only half of adults in the U.S. were screened for diabetes within the last three years, less than what is recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

As the rates of obesity have increased, so does the incidence of type 2 diabetes, which also increases the risk for cardiovascular disease.

Up to one-third of people with diabetes are undiagnosed, note the researchers. Continue reading

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Rise in US diabetes rates slow – CDC

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From the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Glucometer showing a blood sugar of 105New CDC data published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, JAMA, suggest that after decades of continued growth in cases of diagnosed diabetes, the rate of increase may be slowing from year to year.

The study, “Prevalence and Incidence in Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980–2012,” was published today.

“Our findings suggest that, after decades of continued growth in the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes, the diabetes epidemic may be beginning to slow for the first time,” said Linda Geiss, a chief epidemiologist in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation and lead author of the study.

What This Means:

  • About 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year. For the first time, this study shows that number is not getting bigger every year, as in years past, but the numbers are still alarmingly high.
  • These data suggest a change in momentum, a turning of the tides. Now is not the time to let up. Although this news inspires hope, there is still much work to be done.
  • The rate of increase may be slowing from year to year, but diabetes is an urgent public health epidemic, affecting more than 29 million Americans.
  • Although overall growth rates of diagnosed diabetes seem to be slowing, the rate of increase of new cases continues to rise among some groups including:
    • Non-Hispanic blacks.
    • Hispanic men and women, and
    •  People with less than a high school education.

“While this news is encouraging, our work is more important now than ever,” says Ann Albright, PhD, RD, director of CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation. “These evolving trends show we’re moving in the right direction, but millions of people are still diagnosed with diabetes yearly. We need to fortify our efforts to see a real, sustained decrease in new cases of diagnosed diabetes.”

What You Can Do:

Reducing new cases of diabetes is unlikely without continuing to reduce obesity, improve diet, and reduce sedentary lifestyle in the U.S. population, and particularly in those at high risk of developing diabetes. Long-term lifestyle change programs—like the CDC-managed National Diabetes Prevention Program—can help those at high risk of developing the disease.

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Extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years

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ScaleFrom the National Cancer Institute

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a younger age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to a new study.

The study, led by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, found that people with class III (or extreme) obesity had a dramatic reduction in life expectancy compared with people of normal weight. The findings appeared July 8, 2014, in PLOS Medicine.

 Six percent of US adults are now classified as extremely obese

“While once a relatively uncommon condition, the prevalence of class III, or extreme, obesity is on the rise. In the United States, for example, six percent of adults are now classified as extremely obese, which, for a person of average height, is more than 100 pounds over the recommended range for normal weight,” said Cari Kitahara, Ph.D., Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, NCI, and lead author of the study.  Continue reading

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Bionic pancreas outperforms insulin pump in adults, youth – NIH

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Diabetes pump

From right, researcher Dr. Steven Russell of Massachusetts General Hospital stands with Frank Spesia and Colby Clarizia, two participants in a type 1 diabetes trial testing an electronic device called a bionic pancreas – the cellphone-sized device shown – which replaces their traditional fingerstick tests and manual insulin pumps. Photo courtesy of Adam Brown,

From the National Institutes of Health

People with type 1 diabetes who used a bionic pancreas instead of manually monitoring glucose using fingerstick tests and delivering insulin using a pump were more likely to have blood glucose levels consistently within the normal range, with fewer dangerous lows or highs.

The report was published online by the New England Journal of Medicine

TThe researchers — at Boston University and Massachusetts General Hospital — say the process of blood glucose control could improve dramatically with the bionic pancreas. Currently, people with type 1 diabetes walk an endless tightrope.

Because their pancreas doesn’t make the hormone insulin, their blood glucose levels can veer dangerously high and low.

Several times a day they must use fingerstick tests to monitor their blood glucose levels and manually take insulin by injection or from a pump.

In two scenarios, the researchers tested a bihormonal bionic pancreas, which uses a removable tiny sensor located in a thin needle inserted under the skin that automatically monitors real time glucose levels in tissue fluid and provides insulin and its counteracting hormone, glucagon, via two automatic pumps. Continue reading

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Are you the 1 in 4 who doesn’t know? – CDC asks

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Question MarkMore than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, up from the previous estimate of 26 million in 2010, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One in four people with diabetes doesn’t know he or she has it. 

Another 86 million adults – more than one in three U.S. adults – have prediabetes, where their blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Continue reading

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All about sugar substitutes

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fda-logo-thumbnailAn FDA Consumer Update

Whether it’s to cut down on the number of calories they consume or any of a variety of other reasons, some people use sugar substitutes – also called high-intensity sweeteners – to sweeten and add flavor to their foods.

They can be used alone to sweeten foods and beverages such as iced tea or coffee, or as an ingredient in other products. There are a number of sugar substitutes on the market from which to choose. Continue reading

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Obese employees cost employers thousands in extra medical costs – study

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ScaleBy Katherine Kahn
Health Behavior News Service

A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that, on average, a morbidly obese employee costs an employer over $4,000 more per year in health care and related costs than an employee who is of normal weight.

The study also revealed that obese individuals who had comorbidities such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol incurred more costs than obese workers without these conditions, says Karen Van Nuys, Ph.D., lead coauthor and economist at Precision Health Economics in Los Angeles.

“For example, someone who is overweight or obese and also has diabetes is more likely to file a short-term disability claim compared to someone who doesn’t have diabetes but is overweight or obese.” Continue reading

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Patient education tops physician training for diabetes control – study

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Glucometer showing a blood sugar of 105People with diabetes who received counseling at clinic appointments had a 49 percent greater likelihood of achieving long term blood glucose control than patients that did not receive counseling. 

Physician training about managing diabetes seemed to be ineffective at helping patients control their glucose levels, whether or not patients received counseling.

By Valerie DeBenedette
Health Behavior News Service

Teaching people with diabetes how to control their blood glucose levels helps them achieve better results, finds a new study in Ethnicity and Disease.

Surprisingly, providing intensive training to physicians of diabetes patients did not help patients achieve blood glucose control. Continue reading

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FDA warns consumers to stop using GenStrip Blood Glucose Test Strips.

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GenStrips

From the FDA

The US Food and Drug Administration is advising people with diabetes and health care professionals to stop using GenStrip Blood Glucose Test Strips because the strips may report incorrect blood glucose levels.

GenStrip Blood Glucose Test Strips, sold by Shasta Technologies LLC, are “third-party” blood glucose monitoring test strips. Shasta’s GenStrips are advertised for use with the LifeScan OneTouch family of glucose meters (e.g. Ultra, Ultra 2 and Ultra Mini). Continue reading

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Women’s Health – Week 34: Obesity

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From the Office of Research on Women’s Health

tacuin women

Obesity is about more than just your looks. Today, two out of three adults in the United States are considered overweight or obese.

Obesity puts people at increased risk for chronic diseases, such as heart disease,  type 2 diabetes,  high blood pressure,  stroke,  and some forms of cancer. Continue reading

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Women’s Health – Week 18: Gestational Diabetes

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From the Office of Research on Women’s Health

Gestational diabetes (pregnancy)

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that occurs when a woman is pregnant. Changing hormone levels and weight gain are all part of a healthy pregnancy.

But both these changes can make it hard for your body to keep up with its need for a hormone called insulin. Your body may not get the energy it needs from the food you eat and, later in your pregnancy, you could develop gestational diabetes.

Gestational diabetes often goes away after the baby is born but having gestational diabetes can place you and your child at increased risk for developing diabetes later in life.

Taking care of yourself will help keep you and your baby healthy throughout your lives. Important action steps include:

  • Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Being physically active for 30 minutes at least 5 days a week.
  • Following a healthy eating plan.

Your health care provider will decide when you need to be checked for diabetes depending on yourrisk factors. Risk factors include:

  • Age: 25 years of age or older.
  • Weight: Being overweight or obese.
  • Family history: Having a parent, brother, or sister with diabetes.
  • Baby’s birth weight: Delivering a baby weighing more than 9 pounds.
  • Health history: A previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes in an earlier pregnancy.
  • Blood glucose (blood sugar): Having pre-diabetes, a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal.
  • Race/ethnicity: Being of African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander descent.
Risks of gestational diabetes
Having gestational diabetes may increase your risk of high blood pressure or your baby may grow very large. Both can make delivery difficult and dangerous for you both. It can also cause other problems for your baby including: 

  • Low blood glucose right after birth.
  • Breathing problems.
NIH and You
The NIH Office of Research of Women’s Health has partnered with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease’s National Diabetes Education Program on its Small Steps. Big Rewards – It’s Never Too Early…To Prevent Diabetes campaign to increase awareness about the future health risks for women with a history of gestational diabetes and their children. The campaign promotes screening for type 2 diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes, provides advice on future health risks, and promotes the importance of adopting and maintaining healthy behaviors.

for more information: www.niddk.nih.gov

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Women’s Health – Week 17: Complications of Diabetes

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From the Office of Research on Women’s Health

Complications of diabetes

If you have diabetes, you may be at greater risk for many serious health problems. But if you follow your treatment plan and make lifestyle changes, you may be able to prevent or delay serious health problems. Some common complications of diabetes are below.

Eye disease

Damage to the eyes can lead to severe vision loss or even blindness. Eye problems may include:

  • Retinopathy: damage to the blood vessels in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy gets worse with time. You may not notice vision changes at first. Timely treatment and follow-up care help prevent serious vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy usually affects both eyes and is a leading cause of blindness in adults.
  • Cataract: clouding of the eye’s lens. Cataracts develop at an earlier age in people with diabetes.
  • Glaucoma: increase in fluid pressure inside the eye, which leads to optic nerve damage and loss of vision. A person with diabetes is nearly twice as likely to get glaucoma as other adults.

Kidney failure

Diabetes is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney failure, though most people with diabetes do not develop CKD that is severe enough to progress to kidney failure.

People with kidney failure undergo dialysis, an artificial blood-cleaning process, ortransplantation to receive a healthy kidney from a donor.

Researchers have found that high blood pressure and high levels of blood sugar increase the risk that a person with diabetes will develop kidney failure. Controlling your blood pressure and blood sugar may reduce your risk.

Nerve disease

Diabetes can cause serious nerve problems, or neuropathies. People with diabetes can develop nerve damage throughout their body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may experience pain, tingling, or numbness – loss of feeling – in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and the longer a person has diabetes. Neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood sugar as well as those who are overweight or who have high blood pressure or high levels of blood fat.

Foot ulcers and amputations

People with diabetes need to take special care of their feet. The nerves to the feet, the longest in the body, are most often affected in diabetes. Loss of sensation in the feet means that sores or injuries may go unnoticed and may become ulcerated or infected.

Circulation problems also increase the risk of foot ulcers. More than half of all lower-limb amputations in the United States occur in people with diabetes – 86,000 amputations per year.

Health care providers estimate that nearly half of the amputations caused by neuropathy and poor circulation could have been prevented by careful foot care.

Periodontal disease

People with diabetes are at higher risk for developing infections, including periodontal, or gum disease. For more information on dental health, please see Week 13.

For more information: www.ndep.nih.gov

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Women’s Health – Week 16: Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2

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From the Office of Research on Women’s Health

Glucometer showing a blood sugar of 105Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Your blood always has some glucose in it because your body needs glucose for energy. Too much glucose, however, is not good for your health.

Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps the glucose from food get into your cells. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if the insulin does not work the way it should, glucose cannot get into your cells for energy. It stays in your blood instead. Your blood glucose levels then get too high, causing diabetes.

With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas no longer makes insulin. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day. Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5 to 10 percent of diagnosed diabetes in the United States. Children and young adults most often develop type 1 diabetes, but it can appear at any age.

With type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. People with type 2 diabetes often need to take pills or insulin. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and can occur at any age, even childhood.

Having a parent, brother, or sister with diabetes, or being overweight and inactive increases the chances of developing type 2 diabetes.

Pregnant women can also develop diabetes, called gestational diabetes (see Week 18 for more information). Gestational diabetes often goes away after the baby is born. But having gestational diabetes can place you and your child at increased risk for developing diabetes later in life.

Symptoms of diabetes may include fatigue, thirst, weight loss, blurred vision, and frequent urination. With type 2 diabetes, some people have no symptoms at all. A blood test can show if you have diabetes.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, heart, gums, teeth, and nerves. It can lead to blindness, kidney failure, and the loss of a foot or a leg. The most serious problem caused by diabetes is heart disease. If you have diabetes you are more than twice as likely as people without diabetes to have a heart attack or a stroke.

The good news is that if you have diabetes, you can take steps to manage the disease. Learn how to manage the ABCs of diabetes. A is for the HbA1C test, which shows you what your blood glucose has been over the past 3 months. B is for blood pressure and C is for cholesterol.

You can lower your chances of developing serious health problems by keeping your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels in the target range your health care provider gives you. You can manage your diabetes by being active every day and keeping your weight in a healthy range. Follow your meal plan, take your medications, and check your blood glucose as directed by your health care provider.

For more information: www.yourdiabetesinfo.org

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