Category Archives: Endocrine

Back to school with type 1 diabetes – Special event tonight

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Special event: Back to School and T1D
Friday, August 21, 2015
6:00-7:30pm

JDRF and Seattle Children’s Hospital are hosting an event for patients and families to discuss best practices to successfully manage type 1 diabetes through the next school year.

This event includes a panel of knowledgeable professionals that will address your questions and concerns from a variety of perspectives.

Please RSVP at backtoschool-t1D.eventbrite.com

Our panel includes:

  • Grace Kim, MD–Pediatric Endocrinologist, Seattle Children’s Hospital
  • Lindy MacMillan, JD — Attorney with the Washington Medical-Legal Partnership
  • Paul Mystkowski, MD–Endocrinologist, Clinical Faculty, University of Washington
  • Cathryn Plummer, MSN, ARNP, FNP-C–Former school nurse and T1D mom

Seattle Children’s Hospital, Main Campus–River Entrance
4800 Sand Point Way NE
Seattle, WA 98105

To register, please visit www.backtoschool-t1d.eventbrite.com or contact Karine Roettgers kroettgers@jdrf.org or 206.708.2240

JDRF is the largest nonprofit funder of type 1 diabetes (T1D) research in the world. Our goal is to eventually cure and prevent T1D entirely. Along the way to a cure, we seek to deliver an ongoing stream of therapies until we have turned Type One into Type None.

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Cost of diabetes drugs often overlooked, but shouldn’t be

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GlucometerBy Michelle Andrews
KHN

When it comes to treating chronic conditions, diabetes drugs aren’t nearly as sexy as say, Sovaldi, last year’s breakthrough hepatitis C drug that offers a cure for the chronic liver infection at a price approaching six figures.

Yet an estimated 29 million people have diabetes — about 10 times the number of people with hepatitis C — and many of them will take diabetes drugs for the rest of their lives. Cost increases for both old and new drugs alike are forcing many consumers to scramble to pay for them.

“Every week I see patients who can’t afford their drugs.”

“Every week I see patients who can’t afford their drugs,” says Dr. Joel Zonszein, an endocrinologist who’s director of the clinical diabetes center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City.

Many people with diabetes take multiple drugs that work in different ways to control their blood sugar. Although some of the top-selling diabetes drugs like metformin are modestly priced generics, new brand-name drugs continue to be introduced that act in different ways.

They may be more effective and have fewer side effects, but it often comes at a price. For the fourth year in a row, spending on diabetes drugs in 2014 was higher on a per member per year basis than it was for any other class of traditional drug, according to the Express Scripts 2014 Drug Trend Report. Less than half of the prescriptions filled for diabetes treatments were generic. Continue reading

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Event: Back to school and type 1 diabetes

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JDRF Logo
Teen/College Pre Events

Back to School and T1D

Friday, August 21, 2015 6:00-7:30pm

Join us at Seattle Children’s Hospital to discuss best practices to successfully manage type 1 diabetes through the next school year. This event includes a panel of knowledgeable professionals that will address your questions and concerns from a variety of perspectives.  Please RSVP by August 14.

Our panel includes:

  • Lindy MacMillan, JD — Attorney with the Washington Medical-Legal Partnership
  • Paul Mystkowski, MD–Endocrinologist, Clinical Faculty, University of Washington
  • Cathryn Plummer, MSN, ARNP, FNP-C–Former school nurse and T1D mom
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Main Campus–River Entrance
4800 Sand Point Way NE
Seattle, WA 98105
To register, please visit www.backtoschool-t1d.eventbrite.com or contact Karine Roettgers kroettgers@jdrf or 206.708.2240
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Common asthma steroids linked to side effects in adrenal glands | Reuters

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Illustration of the lungs in blueAfter stopping steroids commonly prescribed for asthma and allergies, a significant number of people may experience signs of malfunctioning in the adrenal glands, a European study finds.

So-called adrenal insufficiency can be dangerous, especially if the person’s body has to cope with a stress like surgery, injury or a serious illness, the study authors say.

Source: Common asthma steroids linked to side effects in adrenal glands | Reuters

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Diabetes testing in symptomless adults may not lower risk of death | Reuters

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GlucometerExpanding diabetes screening in adults to catch the disease early does not appear to keep people from dying of cardiovascular causes, according to a report designed to help shape U.S. treatment guidelines.

Earlier detection did seem to slow the progression of so-called prediabetes to full-blown diabetes, but it had no impact on the risk of death from heart or blood vessel disease 10 years later, researchers found when they analyzed studies conducted from 2007 to 2014.

via Diabetes testing in symptomless adults may not lower risk of death | Reuters.

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More choices now available for managing your diabetes

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There are many options available allowing patients with diabetes to monitor and manage their glucose levels. The continuous glucose monitor (CGM) shown here includes a glucose level sensor and transmitter, a data receiver which displays the patient’s glucose levels, and an insulin delivery system. 

Screen Shot 2014-12-05 at 4.22.48 PM

FDA Consumer Update

Do you have diabetes? Do you notice that your blood glucose (sugar) levels rise or fall quickly? Has your doctor prescribed insulin to treat your diabetes? Are you comfortable with using a medical device?

If you answered yes to all of those questions, continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) and insulin pumps are tools that you and your health care professional might consider to assist you in achieving stable blood sugar levels.

Continue reading

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Campaign targets health threats posed by sugar

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SugarScience_Web_Ads_300x250By Lisa Aliferis
KHN and the Washington Post

Dean Schillinger is a primary-care physician at San Francisco General Hospital. He first came to the city in 1990 at the peak of the AIDS epidemic. “At that point, one out of every two patients we admitted was a young man dying of AIDS,” he says.

Today, that same ward is filled with diabetes patients.

“I feel like we are with diabetes where we were in 1990 with the AIDS epidemic,” Schillinger said. “The ward is overwhelmed with diabetes — they’re getting their limbs amputated, they’re on dialysis. And these are young people. They are suffering the ravages of diabetes in the prime of their lives. We’re at the point where we need a public health response to it.”

Schillinger and other researchers at the University of California at San Francisco are setting up a project called Sugar Science, to spell out the health dangers of too much added sugar in our diets.

The project aimed at consumers includes a user-friendly Web site and materials such as television commercials that public health officials can use for outreach. Health departments from San Francisco to New York City have agreed to participate.

Photo: Courtesy of Lauri Andler, Phantom under Creative Commons License.
Continue reading

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Only half of US adults being screened for diabetes

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GlucometerBy Sharyn Alden
Health Behavior News Service

A study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that only half of adults in the U.S. were screened for diabetes within the last three years, less than what is recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA).

As the rates of obesity have increased, so does the incidence of type 2 diabetes, which also increases the risk for cardiovascular disease.

Up to one-third of people with diabetes are undiagnosed, note the researchers. Continue reading

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Rise in US diabetes rates slow – CDC

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From the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Glucometer showing a blood sugar of 105New CDC data published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, JAMA, suggest that after decades of continued growth in cases of diagnosed diabetes, the rate of increase may be slowing from year to year.

The study, “Prevalence and Incidence in Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980–2012,” was published today.

“Our findings suggest that, after decades of continued growth in the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes, the diabetes epidemic may be beginning to slow for the first time,” said Linda Geiss, a chief epidemiologist in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation and lead author of the study.

What This Means:

  • About 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year. For the first time, this study shows that number is not getting bigger every year, as in years past, but the numbers are still alarmingly high.
  • These data suggest a change in momentum, a turning of the tides. Now is not the time to let up. Although this news inspires hope, there is still much work to be done.
  • The rate of increase may be slowing from year to year, but diabetes is an urgent public health epidemic, affecting more than 29 million Americans.
  • Although overall growth rates of diagnosed diabetes seem to be slowing, the rate of increase of new cases continues to rise among some groups including:
    • Non-Hispanic blacks.
    • Hispanic men and women, and
    •  People with less than a high school education.

“While this news is encouraging, our work is more important now than ever,” says Ann Albright, PhD, RD, director of CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation. “These evolving trends show we’re moving in the right direction, but millions of people are still diagnosed with diabetes yearly. We need to fortify our efforts to see a real, sustained decrease in new cases of diagnosed diabetes.”

What You Can Do:

Reducing new cases of diabetes is unlikely without continuing to reduce obesity, improve diet, and reduce sedentary lifestyle in the U.S. population, and particularly in those at high risk of developing diabetes. Long-term lifestyle change programs—like the CDC-managed National Diabetes Prevention Program—can help those at high risk of developing the disease.

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Extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years

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ScaleFrom the National Cancer Institute

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a younger age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to a new study.

The study, led by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, found that people with class III (or extreme) obesity had a dramatic reduction in life expectancy compared with people of normal weight. The findings appeared July 8, 2014, in PLOS Medicine.

 Six percent of US adults are now classified as extremely obese

“While once a relatively uncommon condition, the prevalence of class III, or extreme, obesity is on the rise. In the United States, for example, six percent of adults are now classified as extremely obese, which, for a person of average height, is more than 100 pounds over the recommended range for normal weight,” said Cari Kitahara, Ph.D., Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, NCI, and lead author of the study.  Continue reading

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Bionic pancreas outperforms insulin pump in adults, youth – NIH

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Diabetes pump

From right, researcher Dr. Steven Russell of Massachusetts General Hospital stands with Frank Spesia and Colby Clarizia, two participants in a type 1 diabetes trial testing an electronic device called a bionic pancreas – the cellphone-sized device shown – which replaces their traditional fingerstick tests and manual insulin pumps. Photo courtesy of Adam Brown,

From the National Institutes of Health

People with type 1 diabetes who used a bionic pancreas instead of manually monitoring glucose using fingerstick tests and delivering insulin using a pump were more likely to have blood glucose levels consistently within the normal range, with fewer dangerous lows or highs.

The report was published online by the New England Journal of Medicine

TThe researchers — at Boston University and Massachusetts General Hospital — say the process of blood glucose control could improve dramatically with the bionic pancreas. Currently, people with type 1 diabetes walk an endless tightrope.

Because their pancreas doesn’t make the hormone insulin, their blood glucose levels can veer dangerously high and low.

Several times a day they must use fingerstick tests to monitor their blood glucose levels and manually take insulin by injection or from a pump.

In two scenarios, the researchers tested a bihormonal bionic pancreas, which uses a removable tiny sensor located in a thin needle inserted under the skin that automatically monitors real time glucose levels in tissue fluid and provides insulin and its counteracting hormone, glucagon, via two automatic pumps. Continue reading

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Are you the 1 in 4 who doesn’t know? – CDC asks

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Question MarkMore than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, up from the previous estimate of 26 million in 2010, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One in four people with diabetes doesn’t know he or she has it. 

Another 86 million adults – more than one in three U.S. adults – have prediabetes, where their blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Continue reading

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