Category Archives: Columns

Mixing medications and supplements can be dangerous – FDA

Share

A Consumer Update from the FDA

supplementsWhen you take prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications, do you take also a vitamin, mineral, or other dietary supplements? Have you considered whether there is any danger in mixing medications and dietary supplements?

There could be, says Robert Mozersky, a medical officer at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). “Some dietary supplements may increase the effect of your medication, and other dietary supplements may decrease it,” he says.

“Natural does not always mean safe.”

Certain dietary supplements can change absorption, metabolism, or excretion of a medication and therefore affect its potency.

“You may be getting either too much or too little of a medication you need,” Mozersky warns.

Consequently, combining dietary supplements and medications could have dangerous and even life-threatening effects. For example, drugs for HIV/AIDS, heart disease, depression, treatments for organ transplants, and birth control pills are less effective when taken with St. John’s Wort, an herbal supplement. Depending on the medication involved, the results can be serious. Continue reading

Share

Inks found in certain tattoo kits cause infections – FDA

Share

tatoo inkConsumer Update from the US Food and Drug Administration

Tempted to get a tattoo? Today, people from all walks of life have tattoos, which might lead you to believe that tattoos are completely safe.

But beware—there may be associated health risks.

Recently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) became aware of a problem after testing inks in home use tattoo kits marketed by White and Blue Lion, Inc. FDA has confirmed bacterial contamination in unopened bottles of the company’s inks.

White and Blue Lion, Inc. recalled contaminated products on July 11, 2014, but FDA is still concerned that tattoo artists may be using contaminated inks from other distributors.

According to Linda Katz, M.D., M.P.H., director of FDA’s Office of Cosmetics and Colors, using these inks for tattoos could cause infection.

“FDA has confirmed one case of skin infection involving a consumer that used this company’s tattoo products,” Katz says, “and we are aware of other reports linked to tattoo products with similar packaging.”

Risks Can Be Severe

Continue reading

Share

‘Gluten-Free’ now means what it says

Share

Bread and grainsA Consumer Update from the FDA

In August of last year, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a final rule that defined what characteristics a food has to have to bear a label that proclaims it “gluten-free.”

The rule also holds foods labeled “without gluten,” “free of gluten,” and “no gluten” to the same standard.

Manufacturers had one year to bring their labels into compliance. As of August 5, 2014, any food product bearing a gluten-free claim labeled on or after this date must meet the rule’s requirements.

Without a standardized definition of “gluten-free,” these consumers could never really be sure.

This rule was welcomed by advocates for people with celiac disease, who face potentially life-threatening illnesses if they eat the gluten found in breads, cakes, cereals, pastas and many other foods.

Andrea Levario, executive director of the American Celiac Disease Alliance, notes that there is no cure for celiac disease and the only way to manage the disease is dietary—not eating gluten.

Without a standardized definition of “gluten-free,” these consumers could never really be sure if their body would tolerate a food with that label, she adds. Continue reading

Share

New hepatitis C treatments – FDA Consumer Update

Share

fda-logo-thumbnailFrom the US Food and Drug Administration

At the approval of several new drugs for hepatitis C is  welcome news for baby boomers—who make up three of four adults with the hepatitis C virus—and millions of other Americans, many of whom don’t yet know they are infected and carriers, says the US Food and Drug Administration in this Consumer Update.

Hepatitis C can be cured, and today’s drug therapies are very effective and easier for patients to take, says Jeffrey S. Murray, M.D., the deputy director of the Division of Antiviral Products in FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. Murray is an internist who specializes in infectious diseases.

A Preventable and Curable Disease

Continue reading

Share

Can I cancel my exchange plan if my boss decides to offer coverage?

Share

Question Q&ABy Michelle Andrews
KHN

Q. My husband and I recently bought an HMO plan from Blue Cross Blue Shield on our state exchange.

Now my employer tells us he’s going to begin offering health insurance this month.

What if that’s a better plan and/or a better price?

Can I cancel the one I just purchased and sign up for my employer’s plan? Continue reading

Share

Medications for allergies – an FDA Consumer Update

Share

bee on flowerConsumer Update from the FDA

You’re sneezing, your eyes are itchy and you feel miserable. Seasonal allergies aren’t just a nuisance, they are real diseases that can interfere with work, school or recreation, and can range from mild to severe.

May is National Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month, and many allergy treatment options are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For the first time, these include three sublingual (under the tongue) prescription products to treat hay fever (also called “allergic rhinitis”)—with or without eye inflammation (called “conjunctivitis”)—caused by certain grass pollens and short ragweed pollen.

The new products—GrastekOralair and Ragwitek—can be taken at home, but the first dose must be taken in a health care provider’s office.

About Allergies

Continue reading

Share

FDA warns consumers to stop using GenStrip Blood Glucose Test Strips.

Share

GenStrips

From the FDA

The US Food and Drug Administration is advising people with diabetes and health care professionals to stop using GenStrip Blood Glucose Test Strips because the strips may report incorrect blood glucose levels.

GenStrip Blood Glucose Test Strips, sold by Shasta Technologies LLC, are “third-party” blood glucose monitoring test strips. Shasta’s GenStrips are advertised for use with the LifeScan OneTouch family of glucose meters (e.g. Ultra, Ultra 2 and Ultra Mini). Continue reading

Share

Treating head lice — every parent’s nightmare

Share
Two lice viewed under an electron microscope. Note the claws used to grasp onto individual hairs. Credit: CDC

Lice viewed under an electron microscope, their claws grasping onto individual hairs. – CDC

Consumer Update from the FDA

Head lice. Every parent’s nightmare.

A year-round problem, the number of cases seems to peak when the kids go back to school in the fall and again in January, says Patricia Brown, M.D., a dermatologist at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

An estimated 6 to 12 million cases of head lice infestation occur each year in the United States in children 3 to 11 years of age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Head lice are most common among preschool children attending child care, elementary school children, and household members of children who have lice.

Contrary to myth, head lice are not caused by poor hygiene, Brown says. They are spread mainly by direct head-to-head contact with a person who already has head lice. You cannot get head lice from your pets; lice feed only on humans. Continue reading

Share

Watch out for websites claiming to be Canadian pharmacies, FDA warns

Share

Consumer Update from the US Food and Drug Administration

pills capsules in orbit FDADon’t order medicines from web sites that claim to be Canadian pharmacies.

Most are not legitimate pharmacies, and the drugs they supply are illegal and potentially dangerous.

Claiming to be a Canadian pharmacy is one of the hallmarks of Internet sites that sell illegal prescription drugs which, in many cases, are not made in Canada at all, but in a number of other countries. Continue reading

Share

A reader asks: Will a tax lien affect my premium tax credit?

Share

Question Q&ABy Michelle Andrews
KHN

Q. If I owe state and/or federal taxes and have a lien against me, and I apply for and receive a premium tax credit for health insurance on a state marketplace, will this have to be paid back at some future point?

A. There’s no clear guidance on this issue in the regulations, say tax experts. Continue reading

Share

Readers Ask: Are premium subsidies permanent; Do I have to meet an asset test tor Medicaid?

Share

Question Q&ABy Michelle Andrews, KH
January 10, 2014

Q. Are the subsidies under the health law a permanent fixture, or are they only required for the first two or three years, and then we’ll be expected to pay the full premium?

A. Unless Congress and the president enact a law repealing them, the subsidies are here to stay. The premium tax credits and cost-sharing subsidies that can make marketplace plans more affordable are written into the law as mandatory spending, says Jennifer Tolbert, director of state health reform at the Kaiser Family Foundation. (KHN is an editorially independent program of the foundation.) Continue reading

Share