Author Archives: LocalHealthGuide

Most of the genetic risk for autism due to versions of common genes

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From the National Institutes of Health

Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches, researchers funded by the

National Institutes of Health have found. Heritability also outweighed other risk factors in this largest study of its kind to date.

About 52 percent of the risk for autism was traced to common and rare inherited variation, with spontaneous mutations contributing a modest 2.6 percent of the total risk.

Gene autism

The bulk of risk, or liability, for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other (unaccounted) factors dwarfed contributions from rare inherited, non-additive and spontaneous (de novo) genetic factors. Source: Population-Based Autism Genetics and Environment Study.

“Although each exerts just a tiny effect individually, these common variations in the genetic code add up to substantial impact, taken together,” Buxbaum said. Continue reading

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Enjoy the lake — but please don’t drink the water

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Enjoy the lake this summer but, please, don’t drink the water, say Snohomish health officials

swimmersFrom the Snohomish Health District:

Swimming or playing in water that is contaminated or high in bacteria or natural toxins can affect your health.

Swimming pools, spas, lakes, rivers, or oceans are all potential sources of water-related illness. Recreational water illnesses typically affect a person’s stomach and intestines, causing diarrhea and vomiting. Water quality can also affect your skin or respiratory system.

The recent outbreak of illness at Horseshoe Lake in Kitsap County was caused by norovirus found in the water at the swimming beach. Continue reading

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Half of abortion clinics in Texas close due to new state law

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200px-Flag-map_of_TexasBy Carrie Feibel, KUHF
KHN / JULY 18TH

This story is part of a partnership that includes Houston Public MediaNPR and Kaiser Health News. 

In just over the past year, the number of abortion clinics in Texas fell from 41 to 20, and watchdogs say that as few as six may be left by September.

Many of those closed because of the requirement that doctors at those clinics obtain hospital admitting privileges within a certain radius of the clinic, and many doctors couldn’t comply. That requirement began November 1. This week marks the one-year anniversary of the law that started it all.

Bitter fighting over the law last summer propelled state senator Wendy Davis into the national spotlight, and she is now running for Texas governor on the Democratic ticket.

“We’re seeing delays,” said Heather Busby, executive director of  NARAL Pro-Choice Texas. “We’re seeing people being pushed further into pregnancy, having to leave the state, having to drive and sleep in their cars in parking lots because of these barriers to access.” Continue reading

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If I have a job-based plan, can I still buy on an exchange?

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 Q. It is my understanding that people who are employed and have insurance through their jobs that offer individual coverage for less than 9.5 percent of their income are not eligible to enroll through the state exchange. Am I confused?

A. Yes, you are, but yours is a common misperception. Almost anyone can buy a health plan on the health insurance marketplaces. As long as you live in the United States, you’re a U.S. citizen or someone who’s lawfully present here, and you’re not in jail, you can probably buy a marketplace plan. Continue reading

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State disciplines health care providers – July 15 update

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Seal_of_WashingtonPeriodically Washington State Department of Health issues an update on disciplinary actions taken against health care providers, including suspensions and revocations of licenses, certifications, or registrations of providers in the state.

The department also suspends the credentials of people who have been prohibited from practicing in other states.

Information about health care providers is also on the agency’s website.

To find this information click on “Provider Credential Search” on the left hand side of the Department of Health home page (www.doh.wa.gov).

The site includes information about a health care provider’s license status, the expiration and renewal date of their credential, disciplinary actions and copies of legal documents issued after July 1998.

This information is also available by calling 360-236-4700.

Consumers who think a health care provider acted unprofessionally are also encouraged to call and report their complaint.

Here is the July 16th update issued by the Washington State Department of Health: Continue reading

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A small business owner shops for health insurance

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By Heidi de Marco
KHN Staff Writer

This KHN story was produced in collaboration with .

Sandra Lopez 2 300

Sandra Lopez  (Photo by Heidi de Marco/KHN).

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. — Alongside one of this city’s canals, blocks from the beach, Sandra Lopez is finally living her idea of the American dream.

In 1996, six years after crossing the border from Mexico without papers, she began working at Las Fajitas, a popular Mexican restaurant as a cashier and cook. With the help of her boss, she received a work visa in 2001.

Eleven years after that, she bought the business – a bustling establishment where Lopez knows most customers by name. Mexican lanterns hang from the ceiling, and cheers from a soccer match on TV fill the room.

Lopez said the income from her small business fluctuates monthly. “People think that because you own a business, you have lots of money…that life is easy,” she said. “But it’s hard work and I have so many bills to pay.”

Lopez, her husband, and an adult child in the household live on about $46,000 a year.

For years, she felt she couldn’t afford health insurance for herself, let alone her half dozen employees: “How can I offer them something I don’t even have?” Continue reading

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Why are obstetricians among the top billers for group psychotherapy in Illinois?

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Question markBy Charles Ornstein
ProPublica, July 13, 2014

This story was co-published with The Chicago Tribune.

A few years ago, Illinois’ Medicaid program for the poor noticed some odd trends in its billings for group psychotherapy sessions.

Nursing home residents were being taken several times a week to off-site locations, and Medicaid was picking up the tab for both the services and the transportation.

And then there was this: The sessions were often being performed by obstetrician/gynecologists, oncologists and urologists — “people who didn’t have any training really in psychiatry,” Medicaid director Theresa Eagleson recalled.

Continue reading

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Women’s health – Week 45: Sexually transmitted infections

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tacuin womenFrom the Office of Research on Women’s HealthSexually

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs): also commonly called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), are infections you can get by having sex with someone who has an infection. Continue reading

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Deaths involving heroin and prescription painkillers continue to rise in King County

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drug thumbDeaths involving heroin and prescription painkillers continued to rise in King County in 2013, according to a new annual report prepared by the King County Drug Trends Workgroup.

The lead author of the report is Caleb Banta-Green, a scientist and epidemiologist at the University of Washington’s  Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute.

The report found that deaths involving heroin in King County continue to steadily increase reaching 99 in 2013 up from 49 in 2009 though below the peak of 144 in 1998. Continue reading

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West Nile virus detected in Franklin County

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Franklin CountyMosquito samples collected in Franklin County tested positive for West Nile virus, the Washington State Department of Health said Wednesday.

It’s the first sign that the virus is active in the state this season since mosquito and dead bird testing began last month. Testing will continue until fall when mosquito season ends.

Here are the details from the DoH: Continue reading

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Choosing Wisely – An Evidence-based Music Video

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Choosing Wisely – a parody of the infectious Pharrell Williams song “Happy”  produced by James McCormack — makes the case for choosing wisely when it comes to making health care decisions and if you choose wisely it will make you happy.

An initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation, Choosing Wisely is working to spark conversations between providers and patients to ensure the right care is delivered at the right time.

Participating organizations have created lists of “Things Providers and Patients Should Question” which include evidence-based recommendations that should be discussed to help make wise decisions about the most appropriate care based on a patients’ individual situation.

To learn more about the Choosing Wisely campaign go www.choosingwisely.org.

Continue reading

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Extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years

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ScaleFrom the National Cancer Institute

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a younger age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to a new study.

The study, led by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, found that people with class III (or extreme) obesity had a dramatic reduction in life expectancy compared with people of normal weight. The findings appeared July 8, 2014, in PLOS Medicine.

 Six percent of US adults are now classified as extremely obese

“While once a relatively uncommon condition, the prevalence of class III, or extreme, obesity is on the rise. In the United States, for example, six percent of adults are now classified as extremely obese, which, for a person of average height, is more than 100 pounds over the recommended range for normal weight,” said Cari Kitahara, Ph.D., Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, NCI, and lead author of the study.  Continue reading

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