Author Archives: LocalHealthGuide

UW snaps back against WSU over med school – Puget Sound Business Journal

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UW WashingtonStateCougarsUW officials say the study wildly over-estimated the cost per student to attend medical school at UW.

They also claim a new medical school would suck resources from the existing medical program known as WWAMI, which is named for the five states it operates in: Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. Washington State University is part of the program.

via UW snaps back against WSU over med school – Puget Sound Business Journal.

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Wealthy L.A. Schools’ Vaccination Rates Are as Low as South Sudan’s – The Atlantic

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Photomicrograph of the bacteria that causes whooping cough

Pertussis, the whooping cough bacteria — CDC photo

The Hollywood Reporter has a great investigation for which it sought the vaccination records of elementary schools all over Los Angeles County. They found that vaccination rates in elite neighborhoods like Santa Monica and Beverly Hills have tanked, and the incidence of whooping cough there has skyrocketed.

via Wealthy L.A. Schools’ Vaccination Rates Are as Low as South Sudan’s – The Atlantic.

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Plan will keep White Center’s Greenbridge Public Health Center open

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greenbridgeA partnership between City of Seattle and Planned Parenthood will allow the White Center Public Health Center at Greenbridge to remain open, King County Executive Dow Constantine said Monday.

The White Center clinic, which serves West Seattle, Burien, SeaTac, Tukwila, and Des Moines, was under threat of closing due to cut backs in state and federal funding.

Under the new partnership, Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest will provide family planning services at the facility, while Public Health continues to provide Women, Infant and Children (WIC) and Maternity Support services for the next two years.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has committed $400,000 in 2015 to help keep Greenbridge open and preserve a variety of public health services.

Key details of the partnership include: Continue reading

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Seattle Brain Cancer Walk — this Saturday, Sept. 20th

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Brain Cancer WalkThe 7th annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk will take place on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014 at Seattle Center’s Fisher Pavilion.

Founded in 2008 by a group of committed volunteers and families, the Seattle Brain Cancer Walk has raised over $2.5 million for research, clinical trials and comprehensive care for brain cancer patients in the Pacific Northwest.

100% of the walk proceeds go directly to patient care and research. Continue reading

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WSU: Community health services key to economic development – Puget Sound Business Journal

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WashingtonStateCougarsDoctor shortages and economic development: Those were the two major issues Washington State University officials emphasized Monday after last week’s release of a feasibility study that examined the prospects for a new medical school in Spokane.

via WSU: Community health services key to economic development – Puget Sound Business Journal.

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Obamacare helps slash hospital charity costs in state | Local News | The Seattle Times

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$100-dollar bill inside a capsuleWashington hospitals provided nearly $154 million less in charity care in the first half of this year than in the first half of 2013, in many cases boosting the hospitals’ bottom lines.

Hospitals attributed the plunge in charity care — about 30 percent — to the Affordable Care Act’s focus on reducing the number of uninsured patients.

via Obamacare helps slash hospital charity costs in state | Local News | The Seattle Times.

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Ebola cases could top 10,000 by month’s end, Fred Hutch researchers say

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The number of cases with Ebola, shown here, could double by the end of the month. There is a one in five chance it will reach the U.S. in that same time, researchers predict. Photo:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The number of cases with Ebola, shown here, could double by the end of the month. There is a one in five chance it will reach the U.S. in that same time, researchers predict. Photo: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Disease modeling shows virus is spreading ‘without any end in sight’

By JoNel Aleccia / Fred Hutch News Service

The deadly Ebola epidemic raging across West Africa will likely get far worse before it gets better, more than doubling the number of known cases by the end of this month.

That’s the word from disease modelers at Northeastern University and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, who predict as many as 10,000 cases of Ebola virus disease could be detected by Sept. 24 – and thousands more after that.

“The epidemic just continues to spread without any end in sight,” said Dr. Ira Longini, a biostatistician at the the University of Florida and an affiliated member of Fred Hutch’s Vaccine and Infectious Disease and Public Health Sciences divisions. “The cat’s already out of the box – way, way out.”

It’s only a matter of time, they add, before the virus could start spreading to other places, including previously unaffected countries in Africa and developed nations like the United Kingdom — and the U.S., according to a paper published Sept. 2 in the journal PLOS Currents Outbreaks. Continue reading

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UW pushes back against WSU’s proposed medical school – Puget Sound Business Journal

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UW “We’re disappointed by WSU’s announcement today to pursue a separate, independent medical school aside from the existing Spokane medical school we’ve worked hard to build together in partnership with the Spokane community,” said UW Regent and spokesman Orin Smith in a statement Thursday.

via UW pushes back against WSU’s proposed medical school – Puget Sound Business Journal.

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WSU ‘well positioned’ to open medical school in Spokane – Puget Sound Business Journal

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WashingtonStateCougarsA study, which was commissioned by Washington State University, stated that if planning starts soon, the school’s charter class could begin in the fall of 2017. The state would need to kick in $1 million to $3 million initially to get things started. Once the school is up and running, it would cost an estimated $47 million annually, $24 million of which would be in state funding above current levels.

via WSU ‘well positioned’ to open medical school in Spokane – Puget Sound Business Journal.

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States Seek to Protect Student Athletes from Concussions, Heat Stroke

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SLN_Sept12_2_WGBT calculator

A Wet Bulb Globe Temperature calculator in use last week during a football practice of the Oconee County High School in Watkinsville, Georgia. The device, which measures temperature, humidity and radiant temperature is used to govern sports activities at all Georgia high schools. Photo © Stateline

By Michael Ollove
Stateline

Athens, Georgia—When Georgia public high schools were asked several years ago to devise a policy to govern sports activities during periods of high heat and humidity, one school’s proposal stood out: It pledged to scale back workouts when the heat index reached 140.

Those who understood the heat index, the combined effects of air temperature and humidity, weren’t sure whether to be appalled or amused. “If you hit a heat index of 140,” said Bud Cooper, a sports medicine researcher at the University of Georgia who examined all the proposed policies, “you’d basically be sitting in the Sahara Desert.”

The policy reflected an old-school, “no pain, no gain” philosophy, a view that athletes need to be pushed to their physical limits—or beyond them—if they and their teams are to realize their full potential.

In some places, state, school and sports officials are recognizing that the zeal of coaches, players, and parents for athletic accomplishment must be subordinated to safety. Increasingly, they are adopting measures to protect student athletes from serious, even catastrophic injuries or illnesses that can be the consequence of a blinkered focus on competitiveness. Continue reading

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After a hospital stay, you may you weren’t ‘admitted’

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This KHN story also ran in wapo.

An increasing number of seniors who spend time in the hospital are surprised to learn that they were not “admitted” patients — even though they may have stayed overnight in a hospital bed and received treatment, diagnostic tests and drugs.

Because they were not considered sick enough to require admission but also were not healthy enough to go home, they were kept for observation care, a type of outpatient service.

The distinction between inpatient status and outpatient status matters: Seniors must have three consecutive days as admitted patients to qualify for Medicare coverage for follow-up nursing home care, and no amount of observation time counts for that three-day tally.

That leaves some observation patients with a tough choice: Pay the nursing home bill themselves — often tens of thousands of dollars – or go home without the care their doctor prescribed and recover as best they can.

Angry seniors have sued Medicare and appealed to Congress to change the rules they say make no sense. Although Medicare officials recently began experimenting with limited exemptions, they have been unable to resolve the problem.

But most observation patients with private health insurance don’t face such tough choices. Private insurance policies generally pay for nursing home coverage whether a patient had been admitted or not.

Here’s a primer comparing how Medicare and private insurers handle observation care. Continue reading

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County health officials get court order to stop HIV-infected man | Local News | The Seattle Times

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Niaid-hiv-virion-mod_2To stop a man with HIV who has infected eight other people in the last four years, public health officials have sought court enforcement of its order requiring him to attend counseling and treatment sessions.

via County health officials get court order to stop HIV-infected man | Local News | The Seattle Times.

 

 

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Gates Foundation puts $50 million into Ebola treatment, prevention – Puget Sound Business Journal

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ebolaIn addition to making funds available to the United Nations for the current outbreak, the Seattle-based foundation has stated that it plans to work with public and private sector organizations to develop vaccines and diagnostic tools that could help prevent something like this from happening in the future.

via Gates Foundation puts $50 million into Ebola treatment, prevention – Puget Sound Business Journal.

 

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