UW snaps back against WSU over med school – Puget Sound Business Journal

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UW WashingtonStateCougarsUW officials say the study wildly over-estimated the cost per student to attend medical school at UW.

They also claim a new medical school would suck resources from the existing medical program known as WWAMI, which is named for the five states it operates in: Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. Washington State University is part of the program.

via UW snaps back against WSU over med school – Puget Sound Business Journal.

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Wealthy L.A. Schools’ Vaccination Rates Are as Low as South Sudan’s – The Atlantic

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Photomicrograph of the bacteria that causes whooping cough

Pertussis, the whooping cough bacteria — CDC photo

The Hollywood Reporter has a great investigation for which it sought the vaccination records of elementary schools all over Los Angeles County. They found that vaccination rates in elite neighborhoods like Santa Monica and Beverly Hills have tanked, and the incidence of whooping cough there has skyrocketed.

via Wealthy L.A. Schools’ Vaccination Rates Are as Low as South Sudan’s – The Atlantic.

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Plan will keep White Center’s Greenbridge Public Health Center open

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greenbridgeA partnership between City of Seattle and Planned Parenthood will allow the White Center Public Health Center at Greenbridge to remain open, King County Executive Dow Constantine said Monday.

The White Center clinic, which serves West Seattle, Burien, SeaTac, Tukwila, and Des Moines, was under threat of closing due to cut backs in state and federal funding.

Under the new partnership, Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest will provide family planning services at the facility, while Public Health continues to provide Women, Infant and Children (WIC) and Maternity Support services for the next two years.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has committed $400,000 in 2015 to help keep Greenbridge open and preserve a variety of public health services.

Key details of the partnership include: Continue reading

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States sidestep health law’s measures to curb mandates

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By Michelle Andrews
KHN / September 16, 2014

For decades, states have set rules for health coverage through mandates, laws that require insurers to cover specific types of medical care or services.

The health law contains provisions aimed at curbing this piecemeal approach to coverage. States, however, continue to pass new mandates, but with a twist: Now they’re adding language to sidestep the health law, making it tougher than ever for consumers to know whether they’re covered or not.

Confused? Policy experts fear consumers will be too.

State coverage mandates vary widely. They may require coverage of broad categories of benefits, such as emergency services or maternity care, or of very specific benefits such as autism services, infertility treatment or cleft palate care.

Some mandates require that certain types of providers’ services be covered, such as chiropractors.

They may apply to all individual and group plans regulated by the state, or they may be more limited.

Photo by Michal Zacharzewski

Continue reading

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CDC survey confirms drop in uninsured

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An umbrella sheltering medicines - credit MicrosoftBy Jordan Rau
KHN /SEPTEMBER 16TH, 2014

The federal government’s first survey of the nation’s insured rate since the health care law’s new marketplaces began found a decrease in the number of adults without coverage, particularly among young adults.

The National Health Interview Survey of people during the first three months of this year found that the number of adults under 65 without health insurance dropped to 18.4 percent from 20.4 percent in 2013.

Among all ages, the survey found that the uninsured rate dropped to 13.1 percent from 14.4 percent in 2013; 41 million people still lacked insurance. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – September 16th

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Global health news – September 16th

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Seattle Brain Cancer Walk — this Saturday, Sept. 20th

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Brain Cancer WalkThe 7th annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk will take place on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014 at Seattle Center’s Fisher Pavilion.

Founded in 2008 by a group of committed volunteers and families, the Seattle Brain Cancer Walk has raised over $2.5 million for research, clinical trials and comprehensive care for brain cancer patients in the Pacific Northwest.

100% of the walk proceeds go directly to patient care and research. Continue reading

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WSU: Community health services key to economic development – Puget Sound Business Journal

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WashingtonStateCougarsDoctor shortages and economic development: Those were the two major issues Washington State University officials emphasized Monday after last week’s release of a feasibility study that examined the prospects for a new medical school in Spokane.

via WSU: Community health services key to economic development – Puget Sound Business Journal.

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California to broaden autism coverage for kids through Medicaid

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This KHN story also ran in the .

Maria Cruz had never heard the word autism until her daughter, Shirley, was diagnosed as a toddler.

“I felt a knot in my brain. I didn’t know where to turn,” recalled Cruz, a Mexican immigrant who speaks only Spanish. “I didn’t have any idea how to help her.”

No one in her low-income South Los Angeles neighborhood seemed to know anything about autism spectrum disorder, a developmental condition that can impair language, learning and social interaction.

Starting Monday, Sept. 15, thousands of children in California from low-income families who are on the autism spectrum will be eligible for behavioral therapy under the state’s health plan for the poor.

Years passed as Shirley struggled through school, where she was bullied and beaten up. Now 9, Shirley aces math tests but can barely dress herself, brush her teeth or eat with utensils.

Shirley is like many autistic children from poor families: She hasn’t gotten much outside help. The parents often lack the know-how and means of middle-class families to advocate for their children at schools and state regional centers for the developmentally disabled.

A new initiative seeks to help level the playing field. Starting Monday, Sept. 15, thousands of children from low-income families who are on the autism spectrum will be eligible for behavioral therapy under Medi-Cal, the state’s health plan for the poor. Continue reading

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Obamacare helps slash hospital charity costs in state | Local News | The Seattle Times

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$100-dollar bill inside a capsuleWashington hospitals provided nearly $154 million less in charity care in the first half of this year than in the first half of 2013, in many cases boosting the hospitals’ bottom lines.

Hospitals attributed the plunge in charity care — about 30 percent — to the Affordable Care Act’s focus on reducing the number of uninsured patients.

via Obamacare helps slash hospital charity costs in state | Local News | The Seattle Times.

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Public exposure to measles at Sea-Tac Airport

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Alert IconFrom Public Health – Seattle & King County

Local public health officials are investigating a confirmed case of measles infection in a traveler who was at Sea-Tac airport during the contagious period.

The traveler was likely exposed to measles outside of the United States.

What to do if you were in a location of potential measles exposure  Continue reading

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Health news headlines – September 15th

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Global health news – September 15th

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